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7 Kitchen Tools That Will Help You Stay Healthy This Year


Staying healthy can be hard when you’re used to indulging in sweets, comfort foods, and fried foods. For instance, maybe you want to try to have fruit with breakfast every day, or perhaps you’d like to try a new meatless recipe each week. Every time you hit a goal, the sense of accomplishment will strengthen your desire to keep chugging along.”

Another way to keep chugging along is by having the right tools in your kitchen to keep you healthy and happy. Say goodbye to your deep-fryer and buy cookware from the All Clad NS1 Induction Collection. This cookware set is ideal for healthy eating because you don’t need to add butter or oil when cooking.

You can also buy the Chef’n PopTop which is a healthy way to snack. Yes, you can still have snacks even when you’re trying to be healthy. Cassetty says, “Popcorn is an easy snacking choice that has a lot of perks. It’s 100 percent whole-grain, loaded with antioxidants, and low-cal. Go lightly on the butter and flavor it with herbs and spices instead. Smoked paprika is an easy add-in, or go for a sprinkle of Parmesan cheese.”

Keep reading to find more tools that will help you stay healthy.

All-Clad Immersion Blender

The All-Clad Immersion Blender makes quick work of countless food-prep tasks and is great for making frozen smoothies, homemade hummus, or vegetable soups. It’s the perfect tool to help on your healthy eating journey.

For the All-Clad Immersion Blender, click here.

All-Clad NS1 Nonstick Induction Collection

The All-Clad NS1 Nonstick Induction Collection, made with a PFOA-free nonstick coating, doesn’t require oil or butter, making it ideal for healthy, low-fat cooking.

For the All Clad NS1 Nonstick Induction Collection, click here.

Chef’n PopTop

The perfect tool to help you prep a healthy, guilt-free snack is the Chef’n PopTop. Chef’n PopTop makes healthier, homemade microwave popcorn in minutes — without the use of oil or butter. Constructed from high-heat resistant silicone, PopTop’s fun design unfolds as kernels pop.

For the Chef’n Pop Top, click here.

DavidsTea Handheld Matcha Frother

Instead of drinking coffee to give you energy try a matcha shot. This handheld device makes perfectly frothy shots right at home — just add hot water and matcha to the base and you’ll have a shot of energy right at your fingertips.

For the DavidsTea Handheld Matcha Frother, click here.

IMUSA Gourmet Citrus Juicer

The IMUSA Gourmet Citrus Juicer will be the main squeeze in the kitchen. Featuring a sleek, contemporary design, the Gourmet Citrus Juicer provides an easy-to-use one-lever operation when making juice. The sturdy cast iron strength provides balance and stability when squeezing citrus fruits, while the stainless steel strainer separates seeds and pulp from the juice.

For the IMUSA Gourmet Citrus Juicer, click here.

KRUPS Personal Tea Kettle

Traditional loose-tea brewing takes a contemporary turn with the Krups Personal Tea Kettle. The electric kettle lets you brew up to a liter at a time, with water circulating through a tube to the tea chamber for optimal infusion and flavor. Instead of having coffee in the morning, try having tea — it has great benefits.

For the KRUPS Personal Tea Kettle, click here.

Lagostina Bistecchira

Grilling isn’t just for burgers and hot dogs. You can grill vegetables, fruit, and more to help maintain your healthy diet. The Lagostina Bistecchira has thick, triple wall construction which makes heat distribute evenly, which helps your food grill in the most delicious way.

For the Lagostina Bistecchira, click here.


Dinner for a Dollar: The 20 Ingredients You Need to Cook Simple, Healthy Meals

This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.

This is a guest post from Steph Jenkins, author of Dinner for a Dollar.

“I would love to eat healthier, but it’s just so expensive.”

How many times have you thought that? This is a problem every health-conscious human who lives on a budget has to face.

When my husband and I created our first “now we’re married” budget, we had $25 a week for food. This would not have been a problem if we wanted to live on freeze-dried noodles and peanut butter laced with hydrogenated oil.

However, I had spent the last 6 years of my life helping my family run our small farm. We raised dairy goats, free range chickens, and participated in an organic co-op every week.

The year after I graduated high school, I lived and worked in the poorest country in the world, where I inherited a love for beans and rice and that mysterious joy that accompanies contentment and simple living.

Armed with $25, a head full of farm-to-table strategies, and all the optimism of a newlywed, I was determined to eat well on our tiny budget.

Over the years, as our family grew and our experience did too, I compiled a list of simple, inexpensive real food meals. I could rely on these dinners through every season no matter what the sales ads and coupons offered.

Most of these meals were combinations of the same basic ingredients. Frugal, whole foods staples you could adjust with the seasons and with what you had stashed in the pantry or freezer.


Dinner for a Dollar: The 20 Ingredients You Need to Cook Simple, Healthy Meals

This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.

This is a guest post from Steph Jenkins, author of Dinner for a Dollar.

“I would love to eat healthier, but it’s just so expensive.”

How many times have you thought that? This is a problem every health-conscious human who lives on a budget has to face.

When my husband and I created our first “now we’re married” budget, we had $25 a week for food. This would not have been a problem if we wanted to live on freeze-dried noodles and peanut butter laced with hydrogenated oil.

However, I had spent the last 6 years of my life helping my family run our small farm. We raised dairy goats, free range chickens, and participated in an organic co-op every week.

The year after I graduated high school, I lived and worked in the poorest country in the world, where I inherited a love for beans and rice and that mysterious joy that accompanies contentment and simple living.

Armed with $25, a head full of farm-to-table strategies, and all the optimism of a newlywed, I was determined to eat well on our tiny budget.

Over the years, as our family grew and our experience did too, I compiled a list of simple, inexpensive real food meals. I could rely on these dinners through every season no matter what the sales ads and coupons offered.

Most of these meals were combinations of the same basic ingredients. Frugal, whole foods staples you could adjust with the seasons and with what you had stashed in the pantry or freezer.


Dinner for a Dollar: The 20 Ingredients You Need to Cook Simple, Healthy Meals

This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.

This is a guest post from Steph Jenkins, author of Dinner for a Dollar.

“I would love to eat healthier, but it’s just so expensive.”

How many times have you thought that? This is a problem every health-conscious human who lives on a budget has to face.

When my husband and I created our first “now we’re married” budget, we had $25 a week for food. This would not have been a problem if we wanted to live on freeze-dried noodles and peanut butter laced with hydrogenated oil.

However, I had spent the last 6 years of my life helping my family run our small farm. We raised dairy goats, free range chickens, and participated in an organic co-op every week.

The year after I graduated high school, I lived and worked in the poorest country in the world, where I inherited a love for beans and rice and that mysterious joy that accompanies contentment and simple living.

Armed with $25, a head full of farm-to-table strategies, and all the optimism of a newlywed, I was determined to eat well on our tiny budget.

Over the years, as our family grew and our experience did too, I compiled a list of simple, inexpensive real food meals. I could rely on these dinners through every season no matter what the sales ads and coupons offered.

Most of these meals were combinations of the same basic ingredients. Frugal, whole foods staples you could adjust with the seasons and with what you had stashed in the pantry or freezer.


Dinner for a Dollar: The 20 Ingredients You Need to Cook Simple, Healthy Meals

This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.

This is a guest post from Steph Jenkins, author of Dinner for a Dollar.

“I would love to eat healthier, but it’s just so expensive.”

How many times have you thought that? This is a problem every health-conscious human who lives on a budget has to face.

When my husband and I created our first “now we’re married” budget, we had $25 a week for food. This would not have been a problem if we wanted to live on freeze-dried noodles and peanut butter laced with hydrogenated oil.

However, I had spent the last 6 years of my life helping my family run our small farm. We raised dairy goats, free range chickens, and participated in an organic co-op every week.

The year after I graduated high school, I lived and worked in the poorest country in the world, where I inherited a love for beans and rice and that mysterious joy that accompanies contentment and simple living.

Armed with $25, a head full of farm-to-table strategies, and all the optimism of a newlywed, I was determined to eat well on our tiny budget.

Over the years, as our family grew and our experience did too, I compiled a list of simple, inexpensive real food meals. I could rely on these dinners through every season no matter what the sales ads and coupons offered.

Most of these meals were combinations of the same basic ingredients. Frugal, whole foods staples you could adjust with the seasons and with what you had stashed in the pantry or freezer.


Dinner for a Dollar: The 20 Ingredients You Need to Cook Simple, Healthy Meals

This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.

This is a guest post from Steph Jenkins, author of Dinner for a Dollar.

“I would love to eat healthier, but it’s just so expensive.”

How many times have you thought that? This is a problem every health-conscious human who lives on a budget has to face.

When my husband and I created our first “now we’re married” budget, we had $25 a week for food. This would not have been a problem if we wanted to live on freeze-dried noodles and peanut butter laced with hydrogenated oil.

However, I had spent the last 6 years of my life helping my family run our small farm. We raised dairy goats, free range chickens, and participated in an organic co-op every week.

The year after I graduated high school, I lived and worked in the poorest country in the world, where I inherited a love for beans and rice and that mysterious joy that accompanies contentment and simple living.

Armed with $25, a head full of farm-to-table strategies, and all the optimism of a newlywed, I was determined to eat well on our tiny budget.

Over the years, as our family grew and our experience did too, I compiled a list of simple, inexpensive real food meals. I could rely on these dinners through every season no matter what the sales ads and coupons offered.

Most of these meals were combinations of the same basic ingredients. Frugal, whole foods staples you could adjust with the seasons and with what you had stashed in the pantry or freezer.


Dinner for a Dollar: The 20 Ingredients You Need to Cook Simple, Healthy Meals

This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.

This is a guest post from Steph Jenkins, author of Dinner for a Dollar.

“I would love to eat healthier, but it’s just so expensive.”

How many times have you thought that? This is a problem every health-conscious human who lives on a budget has to face.

When my husband and I created our first “now we’re married” budget, we had $25 a week for food. This would not have been a problem if we wanted to live on freeze-dried noodles and peanut butter laced with hydrogenated oil.

However, I had spent the last 6 years of my life helping my family run our small farm. We raised dairy goats, free range chickens, and participated in an organic co-op every week.

The year after I graduated high school, I lived and worked in the poorest country in the world, where I inherited a love for beans and rice and that mysterious joy that accompanies contentment and simple living.

Armed with $25, a head full of farm-to-table strategies, and all the optimism of a newlywed, I was determined to eat well on our tiny budget.

Over the years, as our family grew and our experience did too, I compiled a list of simple, inexpensive real food meals. I could rely on these dinners through every season no matter what the sales ads and coupons offered.

Most of these meals were combinations of the same basic ingredients. Frugal, whole foods staples you could adjust with the seasons and with what you had stashed in the pantry or freezer.


Dinner for a Dollar: The 20 Ingredients You Need to Cook Simple, Healthy Meals

This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.

This is a guest post from Steph Jenkins, author of Dinner for a Dollar.

“I would love to eat healthier, but it’s just so expensive.”

How many times have you thought that? This is a problem every health-conscious human who lives on a budget has to face.

When my husband and I created our first “now we’re married” budget, we had $25 a week for food. This would not have been a problem if we wanted to live on freeze-dried noodles and peanut butter laced with hydrogenated oil.

However, I had spent the last 6 years of my life helping my family run our small farm. We raised dairy goats, free range chickens, and participated in an organic co-op every week.

The year after I graduated high school, I lived and worked in the poorest country in the world, where I inherited a love for beans and rice and that mysterious joy that accompanies contentment and simple living.

Armed with $25, a head full of farm-to-table strategies, and all the optimism of a newlywed, I was determined to eat well on our tiny budget.

Over the years, as our family grew and our experience did too, I compiled a list of simple, inexpensive real food meals. I could rely on these dinners through every season no matter what the sales ads and coupons offered.

Most of these meals were combinations of the same basic ingredients. Frugal, whole foods staples you could adjust with the seasons and with what you had stashed in the pantry or freezer.


Dinner for a Dollar: The 20 Ingredients You Need to Cook Simple, Healthy Meals

This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.

This is a guest post from Steph Jenkins, author of Dinner for a Dollar.

“I would love to eat healthier, but it’s just so expensive.”

How many times have you thought that? This is a problem every health-conscious human who lives on a budget has to face.

When my husband and I created our first “now we’re married” budget, we had $25 a week for food. This would not have been a problem if we wanted to live on freeze-dried noodles and peanut butter laced with hydrogenated oil.

However, I had spent the last 6 years of my life helping my family run our small farm. We raised dairy goats, free range chickens, and participated in an organic co-op every week.

The year after I graduated high school, I lived and worked in the poorest country in the world, where I inherited a love for beans and rice and that mysterious joy that accompanies contentment and simple living.

Armed with $25, a head full of farm-to-table strategies, and all the optimism of a newlywed, I was determined to eat well on our tiny budget.

Over the years, as our family grew and our experience did too, I compiled a list of simple, inexpensive real food meals. I could rely on these dinners through every season no matter what the sales ads and coupons offered.

Most of these meals were combinations of the same basic ingredients. Frugal, whole foods staples you could adjust with the seasons and with what you had stashed in the pantry or freezer.


Dinner for a Dollar: The 20 Ingredients You Need to Cook Simple, Healthy Meals

This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.

This is a guest post from Steph Jenkins, author of Dinner for a Dollar.

“I would love to eat healthier, but it’s just so expensive.”

How many times have you thought that? This is a problem every health-conscious human who lives on a budget has to face.

When my husband and I created our first “now we’re married” budget, we had $25 a week for food. This would not have been a problem if we wanted to live on freeze-dried noodles and peanut butter laced with hydrogenated oil.

However, I had spent the last 6 years of my life helping my family run our small farm. We raised dairy goats, free range chickens, and participated in an organic co-op every week.

The year after I graduated high school, I lived and worked in the poorest country in the world, where I inherited a love for beans and rice and that mysterious joy that accompanies contentment and simple living.

Armed with $25, a head full of farm-to-table strategies, and all the optimism of a newlywed, I was determined to eat well on our tiny budget.

Over the years, as our family grew and our experience did too, I compiled a list of simple, inexpensive real food meals. I could rely on these dinners through every season no matter what the sales ads and coupons offered.

Most of these meals were combinations of the same basic ingredients. Frugal, whole foods staples you could adjust with the seasons and with what you had stashed in the pantry or freezer.


Dinner for a Dollar: The 20 Ingredients You Need to Cook Simple, Healthy Meals

This post may contain affiliate links which won’t change your price but will share some commission.

This is a guest post from Steph Jenkins, author of Dinner for a Dollar.

“I would love to eat healthier, but it’s just so expensive.”

How many times have you thought that? This is a problem every health-conscious human who lives on a budget has to face.

When my husband and I created our first “now we’re married” budget, we had $25 a week for food. This would not have been a problem if we wanted to live on freeze-dried noodles and peanut butter laced with hydrogenated oil.

However, I had spent the last 6 years of my life helping my family run our small farm. We raised dairy goats, free range chickens, and participated in an organic co-op every week.

The year after I graduated high school, I lived and worked in the poorest country in the world, where I inherited a love for beans and rice and that mysterious joy that accompanies contentment and simple living.

Armed with $25, a head full of farm-to-table strategies, and all the optimism of a newlywed, I was determined to eat well on our tiny budget.

Over the years, as our family grew and our experience did too, I compiled a list of simple, inexpensive real food meals. I could rely on these dinners through every season no matter what the sales ads and coupons offered.

Most of these meals were combinations of the same basic ingredients. Frugal, whole foods staples you could adjust with the seasons and with what you had stashed in the pantry or freezer.