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The Most Embarrassing Fast Food Fails

The Most Embarrassing Fast Food Fails


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They can’t all be Big Macs

Digitalvision/ Thinkstock

Sometimes chains strike gold with a new release; just look at Taco Bell’s now-legendary Doritos Locos, which generated more than a billion dollars in revenue for the chain within months of its release. But for every Doritos Locos, there are 10 Pizza Hut Priazzos.

The Most Embarrassing Fast Food Fails

Digitalvision/ Thinkstock

Sometimes chains strike gold with a new release; just look at Taco Bell’s now-legendary Doritos Locos, which generated more than a billion dollars in revenue for the chain within months of its release. But for every Doritos Locos, there are 10 Pizza Hut Priazzos.

McDonald’s: Arch Deluxe

In 1996, McDonald’s spent more money on the advertising campaign for this burger than it had on any other single item in its history. A quarter-pounder on a split-top potato bun with add-ons like circular peppered bacon, lettuce, Spanish onions, and a mustard-mayo sauce that the company spent more than $150 million to market, The Arch Deluxe flopped, making the sandwich a very expensive mistake.

Wendy’s: Superbar

For a period in the ‘80s and ‘90s, Wendy's expanded their salad bar into a full "Superbar" buffet. Salad, fruit, Mexican fare, and pasta were all available for a low price (usually $2.99), and it was a big success. Too much of a success, actually: it was difficult for employees to keep the buffet stocked and clean while performing their usual behind-the-counter duties, and customers would help themselves to a few too many free refills. The Superbar disappeared in 1998, and Wendy's discontinued all salad bars in 2006.

McDonald’s: Mighty Wings

iStockPhoto/ Thinkstock

McDonald’s finally rolled out chicken wings nationally in September 2013 after years of trial and error, at the price of about a dollar per wing. Spicy, crunchy, and generally well-reviewed, the chain bought 50 million pounds of wings with plans to leave them on the menu until supplies ran out (and then make them a permanent addition after that). Things didn’t go exactly as planned, however. Sales quickly petered out, and McDonald’s was left with 10 million pounds of unsold wings.

Burger King: Table Service

Back in 1991, Burger King thought that it would be a good idea to let customers order their food between the hours of 5 and 8 p.m., then take a seat at their table, snack on free popcorn, and have their food brought to them. Most people really didn’t mind bringing their own food to their table, so this idea quickly fizzled out thanks to that old adage: if it ain’t broke, don’t fix it.

Domino’s: Oreo Dessert Pizza

A giant cookie, topped with vanilla sauce and crumbled Oreos, served hot. What could go wrong? A whole lot, apparently. This attempt at a dessert pie appeared at Domino’s locations in 2007, was universally panned for being too sweet, chewy, and generally unappealing, and disappeared shortly thereafter.

Burger King: Enormous Omelet Sandwich

The mid-2000s was the era of the “EXTREME,” and in 2005 Burger King attempted to cash in by pairing that with the growing trend of fast food breakfast sandwiches by introducing the Enormous Omelet Sandwich. Comprised of eggs, cheese, bacon, and sausage on a sesame seed roll (add ham and you’ve got the Meat’normous Omelet Sandwich), this artery-clogging overload performed well at first, but sales fizzled out once consumers realized that they probably didn’t want to eat 330 milligrams of cholesterol for breakfast.

McDonald’s: McDLT

Wikimedia Commons

On the surface, it was a good idea: serve a burger in a Styrofoam container with two separate compartments, one containing the hot beef patty and bottom bun and the other with the cool lettuce and tomato and the top bun. Put them together and you’ve got the perfect burger! The McDLT stuck around for six years between 1984 and 1990, but was discontinued due to complaints that the large amount of Styrofoam in the packaging was environmentally unfriendly.

Dunkin Donuts: Free Iced Coffee Day

Dunkin’ Donuts announced back in 2012 that in honor of their 60th anniversary, participating locations would be giving away free iced coffee for one day only. Sounds great, right? The catch: “participating locations” only existed in five states. When people showed up to their local DD’s expecting free iced coffee, they weren’t happy to be turned away, leading to a major headache for corporate and franchise owners alike.

Pizza Hut: Priazzo

$15 million went into marketing this Pizza Hut creation in 1985, which was essentially a pizza with two crusts, piled with meat and cheese, meant to resemble a deep-dish pizza. While sales were pretty good (and it’s still fondly remembered by many to this day), the fact of the matter was that it simply took too long to prepare, and it was removed from menus after a few years.

Taco Bell: Frito Burrito

Taco Bell once had chili on its menu, and wrapped it up with cheese into a chili-cheese burrito. Those familiar with Frito pie (chili and cheese mixed up with Fritos inside the bag) can understand why Fritos would be an obvious addition, but most of the country just scratched their heads, and the item was discontinued. There remained a rabid fan base, however, so earlier this year the chain re-introduced Fritos to the menu in the form of the Beefy Fritos Burrito, with seasoned beef instead of chili.

Wendy’s: Frescata

iStockphoto/ Thinkstock

Intended to offer some competition to Subway, these deli-style “artisan sandwiches” were rolled out in 2006. They sold decently, but their fatal flaw was assembly time: they took a lot longer to prepare than burgers. They disappeared from menus in 2007.


Top 10 Food Fads of All Time

Merriam-Webster defines "fad" as a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal. We latch onto fads in fashion, pop culture, technology, and, yes, fads in food. Every year it seems there's a new "it" food. Suddenly, every restaurant is serving up the latest craze -- foams, sundried tomatoes, kiwi cocktails. But soon the fad fades, and the "flavor of the week" settles into obscurity, or at the very least, the below-eye-level grocery shelves.

Let's take a look at some of the most popular food fads of all time. You might find some of them tasty. And you might find some of them absolutely gross.

It was created in 1972, but the Atkins diet didn't captivate America until the late '90s and early 2000s. Devotees claimed weight loss of 15 pounds in the first two weeks. And suddenly everything on grocery store shelves was "low-carb," "no-carb" and "Atkins-approved."

The Atkins diet shuns carbohydrates for proteins and fats. During the first phase of the diet, carbs are cut out almost entirely. This means no bread, grains, baked goods, pastas, fruits, nuts or alcohol. Later, "good" carbs like vegetables are slowly added back in.

The medical community states the Atkins diet is no more effective than any other diet. The consensus is that weight loss occurs not because of carb cutting, but because food intake is restricted. Nevertheless, you'll still find plenty of people eating burgers sans buns.

Ah, the TV dinner. We're not talking about the fancy frozen food stocked in today's freezers -- sirloin tips, grilled salmon or pasta primavera. Think 1950s, aluminum trays, and peeling back the foil to reveal steaming-hot turkey or Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes and corn, and a bit of cherry cobbler. People would settle in with their TV dinners on trays in the family room and watch the tube while they ate.

The earliest "TV dinner" dates back to 1945, but it wasn't really a TV dinner it was consumed on airplanes. Around 1954, though, Swanson took the idea and ran with it, pairing up the frozen meal with the latest technology craze -- the small screen.

Swanson launched its line of TV dinners to solve a problem: too many Thanksgiving turkey leftovers -- 260 tons, to be exact.

Believe it or not, bacon is currently enjoying a boom in popularity. We blame this food fad on the Internet everywhere you click, a food blog is waxing poetic about the salted meat. A simple Google search yields endless bacon-related results, including candied bacon, bacon tattoos, bacon salt, deep-fried bacon and even instructions on how to make a bacon bra.

Bacon's not just popular on the Internet, though. The bacon meme has worked its way into real life. Many restaurants and fast-food chains now highlight bacon-heavy entrees on their menus. It's probably one of the most unhealthy food fads ever!

Today, we mostly think of gelatin (and the No. 1 brand, JELL-O) as a dessert. For a while, however, gelatin was actually featured as the main course.

Yep, not only did we serve gelatin as a main course, but we mixed it with things like meat, olives and mayonnaise. It seems crazy now, but gelatin "salads" were all the rage at dinner parties in the 1950s. To wit -- celery-flavored gelatin, congealed with chopped celery, pimento olives and cheese. Lime-flavored gelatin, with mayonnaise, cucumber and canned tuna. Unflavored gelatin with floating bits of turkey, chicken, carrots and green beans.

Think twice before serving a gelatin product to any of your vegetarian friends. Gelatin contains animal by-products, including hooves and bones.

When American astronaut Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon in July 1969, he launched craze for anything space-themed.

The most popular of these was the powdered orange-flavored drink Tang. Although many people believed Tang was created specifically for the space program, it wasn't. At the time, General Foods sold Tang as a travel drink for consumers, but the space program thought it was a great idea. Add in a beloved advertising campaign showing astronauts drinking Tang, and a food fad was born.

Kids who wanted to emulate astronauts also chowed down on "Space Sticks," a forerunner to today's protein bars, and space-age treats like freeze-dried ice cream.

Remember when the only things deep-fried were french fries, onion rings and chicken? Well, things have changed. People will deep-fry anything nowadays, and other people will line up to try it. Here's a sampling of what you can get deep-fried: pickles, avocadoes, Oreo cookies, pizza, spaghetti and meatballs (really!) and even Coca-Cola.

Some people think the deep-fried craze erupted as a spiteful counter to the current healthy/organic food movement. Go ahead and sample that deep-fried Twinkie if you must, but don't even think about making it part of your regular diet your heart and waistline will suffer.

Hugely popular in the 1970s, fondue was a staple at dinner parties. Picture it: people gathered around a pot of bubbling cheese, dipping bread and fruits with long forks into the pot, chatting and drinking wine. So cozy! No wonder every newlywed in the '70s seemed to acquire a fondue pot as a gift.

A typical fondue contains cheese, wine, flour and seasonings. A flame keeps it hot while everyone eats. Dipping items might include bread or fruit.

Oil fondues enable you to cook up your own meat. And dessert fondues mean you can dip everything from marshmallows to apricots into warm chocolate.

Just like the frozen yogurt and Cinnabon crazes before it, the cupcake craze is the latest trend in sweet snacks. Most people credit the television show "Sex and the City" with jump-starting the cupcake's massive popularity. After Carrie Bradshaw ate a cupcake from New York's Magnolia Bakery, people were suddenly lining up around the block.

How popular are cupcakes? The Wall Street Journal recently noted that cupcake bakeries are an important part of the improving job market in New York City.

These aren't your mother's cupcakes, either. Today you'll find cupcakes in flavors like dulce de leche, pina colada, peanut butter and jelly, red wine or tiramisu. Yum!

Some people call them "slow cookers," but they're more commonly known by the brand-name Crock Pot. The Crock Pot came out in 1971, and women everywhere immediately embraced it. After all, they could start a meal in the morning, and the Crock Pot would have it ready by dinnertime. Keep in mind, this was during a time when women were entering or re-entering the workforce in record numbers and trying to find a balance between work and home life.

Crock Pot cooking is simple -- just put a bunch of ingredients in the pot, turn on the low heat, and the dish will cook slowly all day. Modern slow cookers come with timers to offer more flexibility with cooking times.

In 1975, Mable Hoffman's "Crockery Cookery" unseated "The Joy of Sex" as the No. 1 selling paperback. Guess we know where priorities were that year!

In the late 1980s, Americans went crazy for oats. Suddenly oatmeal, the scourge of breakfast choices, found itself the most popular girl at the dance. Why all the attention? A study came out stating that eating oats could lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

Faster than you could say "oatmeal cookie," oatmeal products were flying off the shelves. Unfortunately, even though these products contained oatmeal, many them weren't as healthy as advertised. For example, oat bran muffins exploded in popularity, but dieters didn't realize that the egg yolks in the muffins negated any positive effects from the oats. Fear not, though -- it's not all bad news. We simply recommend you make wise and informed choices. The oat bran craze continues today under the guise of the whole-grain trend.

Do you love food? We do, too. Check out the links on the next page to satisfy your appetite!


Top 10 Food Fads of All Time

Merriam-Webster defines "fad" as a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal. We latch onto fads in fashion, pop culture, technology, and, yes, fads in food. Every year it seems there's a new "it" food. Suddenly, every restaurant is serving up the latest craze -- foams, sundried tomatoes, kiwi cocktails. But soon the fad fades, and the "flavor of the week" settles into obscurity, or at the very least, the below-eye-level grocery shelves.

Let's take a look at some of the most popular food fads of all time. You might find some of them tasty. And you might find some of them absolutely gross.

It was created in 1972, but the Atkins diet didn't captivate America until the late '90s and early 2000s. Devotees claimed weight loss of 15 pounds in the first two weeks. And suddenly everything on grocery store shelves was "low-carb," "no-carb" and "Atkins-approved."

The Atkins diet shuns carbohydrates for proteins and fats. During the first phase of the diet, carbs are cut out almost entirely. This means no bread, grains, baked goods, pastas, fruits, nuts or alcohol. Later, "good" carbs like vegetables are slowly added back in.

The medical community states the Atkins diet is no more effective than any other diet. The consensus is that weight loss occurs not because of carb cutting, but because food intake is restricted. Nevertheless, you'll still find plenty of people eating burgers sans buns.

Ah, the TV dinner. We're not talking about the fancy frozen food stocked in today's freezers -- sirloin tips, grilled salmon or pasta primavera. Think 1950s, aluminum trays, and peeling back the foil to reveal steaming-hot turkey or Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes and corn, and a bit of cherry cobbler. People would settle in with their TV dinners on trays in the family room and watch the tube while they ate.

The earliest "TV dinner" dates back to 1945, but it wasn't really a TV dinner it was consumed on airplanes. Around 1954, though, Swanson took the idea and ran with it, pairing up the frozen meal with the latest technology craze -- the small screen.

Swanson launched its line of TV dinners to solve a problem: too many Thanksgiving turkey leftovers -- 260 tons, to be exact.

Believe it or not, bacon is currently enjoying a boom in popularity. We blame this food fad on the Internet everywhere you click, a food blog is waxing poetic about the salted meat. A simple Google search yields endless bacon-related results, including candied bacon, bacon tattoos, bacon salt, deep-fried bacon and even instructions on how to make a bacon bra.

Bacon's not just popular on the Internet, though. The bacon meme has worked its way into real life. Many restaurants and fast-food chains now highlight bacon-heavy entrees on their menus. It's probably one of the most unhealthy food fads ever!

Today, we mostly think of gelatin (and the No. 1 brand, JELL-O) as a dessert. For a while, however, gelatin was actually featured as the main course.

Yep, not only did we serve gelatin as a main course, but we mixed it with things like meat, olives and mayonnaise. It seems crazy now, but gelatin "salads" were all the rage at dinner parties in the 1950s. To wit -- celery-flavored gelatin, congealed with chopped celery, pimento olives and cheese. Lime-flavored gelatin, with mayonnaise, cucumber and canned tuna. Unflavored gelatin with floating bits of turkey, chicken, carrots and green beans.

Think twice before serving a gelatin product to any of your vegetarian friends. Gelatin contains animal by-products, including hooves and bones.

When American astronaut Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon in July 1969, he launched craze for anything space-themed.

The most popular of these was the powdered orange-flavored drink Tang. Although many people believed Tang was created specifically for the space program, it wasn't. At the time, General Foods sold Tang as a travel drink for consumers, but the space program thought it was a great idea. Add in a beloved advertising campaign showing astronauts drinking Tang, and a food fad was born.

Kids who wanted to emulate astronauts also chowed down on "Space Sticks," a forerunner to today's protein bars, and space-age treats like freeze-dried ice cream.

Remember when the only things deep-fried were french fries, onion rings and chicken? Well, things have changed. People will deep-fry anything nowadays, and other people will line up to try it. Here's a sampling of what you can get deep-fried: pickles, avocadoes, Oreo cookies, pizza, spaghetti and meatballs (really!) and even Coca-Cola.

Some people think the deep-fried craze erupted as a spiteful counter to the current healthy/organic food movement. Go ahead and sample that deep-fried Twinkie if you must, but don't even think about making it part of your regular diet your heart and waistline will suffer.

Hugely popular in the 1970s, fondue was a staple at dinner parties. Picture it: people gathered around a pot of bubbling cheese, dipping bread and fruits with long forks into the pot, chatting and drinking wine. So cozy! No wonder every newlywed in the '70s seemed to acquire a fondue pot as a gift.

A typical fondue contains cheese, wine, flour and seasonings. A flame keeps it hot while everyone eats. Dipping items might include bread or fruit.

Oil fondues enable you to cook up your own meat. And dessert fondues mean you can dip everything from marshmallows to apricots into warm chocolate.

Just like the frozen yogurt and Cinnabon crazes before it, the cupcake craze is the latest trend in sweet snacks. Most people credit the television show "Sex and the City" with jump-starting the cupcake's massive popularity. After Carrie Bradshaw ate a cupcake from New York's Magnolia Bakery, people were suddenly lining up around the block.

How popular are cupcakes? The Wall Street Journal recently noted that cupcake bakeries are an important part of the improving job market in New York City.

These aren't your mother's cupcakes, either. Today you'll find cupcakes in flavors like dulce de leche, pina colada, peanut butter and jelly, red wine or tiramisu. Yum!

Some people call them "slow cookers," but they're more commonly known by the brand-name Crock Pot. The Crock Pot came out in 1971, and women everywhere immediately embraced it. After all, they could start a meal in the morning, and the Crock Pot would have it ready by dinnertime. Keep in mind, this was during a time when women were entering or re-entering the workforce in record numbers and trying to find a balance between work and home life.

Crock Pot cooking is simple -- just put a bunch of ingredients in the pot, turn on the low heat, and the dish will cook slowly all day. Modern slow cookers come with timers to offer more flexibility with cooking times.

In 1975, Mable Hoffman's "Crockery Cookery" unseated "The Joy of Sex" as the No. 1 selling paperback. Guess we know where priorities were that year!

In the late 1980s, Americans went crazy for oats. Suddenly oatmeal, the scourge of breakfast choices, found itself the most popular girl at the dance. Why all the attention? A study came out stating that eating oats could lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

Faster than you could say "oatmeal cookie," oatmeal products were flying off the shelves. Unfortunately, even though these products contained oatmeal, many them weren't as healthy as advertised. For example, oat bran muffins exploded in popularity, but dieters didn't realize that the egg yolks in the muffins negated any positive effects from the oats. Fear not, though -- it's not all bad news. We simply recommend you make wise and informed choices. The oat bran craze continues today under the guise of the whole-grain trend.

Do you love food? We do, too. Check out the links on the next page to satisfy your appetite!


Top 10 Food Fads of All Time

Merriam-Webster defines "fad" as a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal. We latch onto fads in fashion, pop culture, technology, and, yes, fads in food. Every year it seems there's a new "it" food. Suddenly, every restaurant is serving up the latest craze -- foams, sundried tomatoes, kiwi cocktails. But soon the fad fades, and the "flavor of the week" settles into obscurity, or at the very least, the below-eye-level grocery shelves.

Let's take a look at some of the most popular food fads of all time. You might find some of them tasty. And you might find some of them absolutely gross.

It was created in 1972, but the Atkins diet didn't captivate America until the late '90s and early 2000s. Devotees claimed weight loss of 15 pounds in the first two weeks. And suddenly everything on grocery store shelves was "low-carb," "no-carb" and "Atkins-approved."

The Atkins diet shuns carbohydrates for proteins and fats. During the first phase of the diet, carbs are cut out almost entirely. This means no bread, grains, baked goods, pastas, fruits, nuts or alcohol. Later, "good" carbs like vegetables are slowly added back in.

The medical community states the Atkins diet is no more effective than any other diet. The consensus is that weight loss occurs not because of carb cutting, but because food intake is restricted. Nevertheless, you'll still find plenty of people eating burgers sans buns.

Ah, the TV dinner. We're not talking about the fancy frozen food stocked in today's freezers -- sirloin tips, grilled salmon or pasta primavera. Think 1950s, aluminum trays, and peeling back the foil to reveal steaming-hot turkey or Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes and corn, and a bit of cherry cobbler. People would settle in with their TV dinners on trays in the family room and watch the tube while they ate.

The earliest "TV dinner" dates back to 1945, but it wasn't really a TV dinner it was consumed on airplanes. Around 1954, though, Swanson took the idea and ran with it, pairing up the frozen meal with the latest technology craze -- the small screen.

Swanson launched its line of TV dinners to solve a problem: too many Thanksgiving turkey leftovers -- 260 tons, to be exact.

Believe it or not, bacon is currently enjoying a boom in popularity. We blame this food fad on the Internet everywhere you click, a food blog is waxing poetic about the salted meat. A simple Google search yields endless bacon-related results, including candied bacon, bacon tattoos, bacon salt, deep-fried bacon and even instructions on how to make a bacon bra.

Bacon's not just popular on the Internet, though. The bacon meme has worked its way into real life. Many restaurants and fast-food chains now highlight bacon-heavy entrees on their menus. It's probably one of the most unhealthy food fads ever!

Today, we mostly think of gelatin (and the No. 1 brand, JELL-O) as a dessert. For a while, however, gelatin was actually featured as the main course.

Yep, not only did we serve gelatin as a main course, but we mixed it with things like meat, olives and mayonnaise. It seems crazy now, but gelatin "salads" were all the rage at dinner parties in the 1950s. To wit -- celery-flavored gelatin, congealed with chopped celery, pimento olives and cheese. Lime-flavored gelatin, with mayonnaise, cucumber and canned tuna. Unflavored gelatin with floating bits of turkey, chicken, carrots and green beans.

Think twice before serving a gelatin product to any of your vegetarian friends. Gelatin contains animal by-products, including hooves and bones.

When American astronaut Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon in July 1969, he launched craze for anything space-themed.

The most popular of these was the powdered orange-flavored drink Tang. Although many people believed Tang was created specifically for the space program, it wasn't. At the time, General Foods sold Tang as a travel drink for consumers, but the space program thought it was a great idea. Add in a beloved advertising campaign showing astronauts drinking Tang, and a food fad was born.

Kids who wanted to emulate astronauts also chowed down on "Space Sticks," a forerunner to today's protein bars, and space-age treats like freeze-dried ice cream.

Remember when the only things deep-fried were french fries, onion rings and chicken? Well, things have changed. People will deep-fry anything nowadays, and other people will line up to try it. Here's a sampling of what you can get deep-fried: pickles, avocadoes, Oreo cookies, pizza, spaghetti and meatballs (really!) and even Coca-Cola.

Some people think the deep-fried craze erupted as a spiteful counter to the current healthy/organic food movement. Go ahead and sample that deep-fried Twinkie if you must, but don't even think about making it part of your regular diet your heart and waistline will suffer.

Hugely popular in the 1970s, fondue was a staple at dinner parties. Picture it: people gathered around a pot of bubbling cheese, dipping bread and fruits with long forks into the pot, chatting and drinking wine. So cozy! No wonder every newlywed in the '70s seemed to acquire a fondue pot as a gift.

A typical fondue contains cheese, wine, flour and seasonings. A flame keeps it hot while everyone eats. Dipping items might include bread or fruit.

Oil fondues enable you to cook up your own meat. And dessert fondues mean you can dip everything from marshmallows to apricots into warm chocolate.

Just like the frozen yogurt and Cinnabon crazes before it, the cupcake craze is the latest trend in sweet snacks. Most people credit the television show "Sex and the City" with jump-starting the cupcake's massive popularity. After Carrie Bradshaw ate a cupcake from New York's Magnolia Bakery, people were suddenly lining up around the block.

How popular are cupcakes? The Wall Street Journal recently noted that cupcake bakeries are an important part of the improving job market in New York City.

These aren't your mother's cupcakes, either. Today you'll find cupcakes in flavors like dulce de leche, pina colada, peanut butter and jelly, red wine or tiramisu. Yum!

Some people call them "slow cookers," but they're more commonly known by the brand-name Crock Pot. The Crock Pot came out in 1971, and women everywhere immediately embraced it. After all, they could start a meal in the morning, and the Crock Pot would have it ready by dinnertime. Keep in mind, this was during a time when women were entering or re-entering the workforce in record numbers and trying to find a balance between work and home life.

Crock Pot cooking is simple -- just put a bunch of ingredients in the pot, turn on the low heat, and the dish will cook slowly all day. Modern slow cookers come with timers to offer more flexibility with cooking times.

In 1975, Mable Hoffman's "Crockery Cookery" unseated "The Joy of Sex" as the No. 1 selling paperback. Guess we know where priorities were that year!

In the late 1980s, Americans went crazy for oats. Suddenly oatmeal, the scourge of breakfast choices, found itself the most popular girl at the dance. Why all the attention? A study came out stating that eating oats could lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

Faster than you could say "oatmeal cookie," oatmeal products were flying off the shelves. Unfortunately, even though these products contained oatmeal, many them weren't as healthy as advertised. For example, oat bran muffins exploded in popularity, but dieters didn't realize that the egg yolks in the muffins negated any positive effects from the oats. Fear not, though -- it's not all bad news. We simply recommend you make wise and informed choices. The oat bran craze continues today under the guise of the whole-grain trend.

Do you love food? We do, too. Check out the links on the next page to satisfy your appetite!


Top 10 Food Fads of All Time

Merriam-Webster defines "fad" as a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal. We latch onto fads in fashion, pop culture, technology, and, yes, fads in food. Every year it seems there's a new "it" food. Suddenly, every restaurant is serving up the latest craze -- foams, sundried tomatoes, kiwi cocktails. But soon the fad fades, and the "flavor of the week" settles into obscurity, or at the very least, the below-eye-level grocery shelves.

Let's take a look at some of the most popular food fads of all time. You might find some of them tasty. And you might find some of them absolutely gross.

It was created in 1972, but the Atkins diet didn't captivate America until the late '90s and early 2000s. Devotees claimed weight loss of 15 pounds in the first two weeks. And suddenly everything on grocery store shelves was "low-carb," "no-carb" and "Atkins-approved."

The Atkins diet shuns carbohydrates for proteins and fats. During the first phase of the diet, carbs are cut out almost entirely. This means no bread, grains, baked goods, pastas, fruits, nuts or alcohol. Later, "good" carbs like vegetables are slowly added back in.

The medical community states the Atkins diet is no more effective than any other diet. The consensus is that weight loss occurs not because of carb cutting, but because food intake is restricted. Nevertheless, you'll still find plenty of people eating burgers sans buns.

Ah, the TV dinner. We're not talking about the fancy frozen food stocked in today's freezers -- sirloin tips, grilled salmon or pasta primavera. Think 1950s, aluminum trays, and peeling back the foil to reveal steaming-hot turkey or Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes and corn, and a bit of cherry cobbler. People would settle in with their TV dinners on trays in the family room and watch the tube while they ate.

The earliest "TV dinner" dates back to 1945, but it wasn't really a TV dinner it was consumed on airplanes. Around 1954, though, Swanson took the idea and ran with it, pairing up the frozen meal with the latest technology craze -- the small screen.

Swanson launched its line of TV dinners to solve a problem: too many Thanksgiving turkey leftovers -- 260 tons, to be exact.

Believe it or not, bacon is currently enjoying a boom in popularity. We blame this food fad on the Internet everywhere you click, a food blog is waxing poetic about the salted meat. A simple Google search yields endless bacon-related results, including candied bacon, bacon tattoos, bacon salt, deep-fried bacon and even instructions on how to make a bacon bra.

Bacon's not just popular on the Internet, though. The bacon meme has worked its way into real life. Many restaurants and fast-food chains now highlight bacon-heavy entrees on their menus. It's probably one of the most unhealthy food fads ever!

Today, we mostly think of gelatin (and the No. 1 brand, JELL-O) as a dessert. For a while, however, gelatin was actually featured as the main course.

Yep, not only did we serve gelatin as a main course, but we mixed it with things like meat, olives and mayonnaise. It seems crazy now, but gelatin "salads" were all the rage at dinner parties in the 1950s. To wit -- celery-flavored gelatin, congealed with chopped celery, pimento olives and cheese. Lime-flavored gelatin, with mayonnaise, cucumber and canned tuna. Unflavored gelatin with floating bits of turkey, chicken, carrots and green beans.

Think twice before serving a gelatin product to any of your vegetarian friends. Gelatin contains animal by-products, including hooves and bones.

When American astronaut Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon in July 1969, he launched craze for anything space-themed.

The most popular of these was the powdered orange-flavored drink Tang. Although many people believed Tang was created specifically for the space program, it wasn't. At the time, General Foods sold Tang as a travel drink for consumers, but the space program thought it was a great idea. Add in a beloved advertising campaign showing astronauts drinking Tang, and a food fad was born.

Kids who wanted to emulate astronauts also chowed down on "Space Sticks," a forerunner to today's protein bars, and space-age treats like freeze-dried ice cream.

Remember when the only things deep-fried were french fries, onion rings and chicken? Well, things have changed. People will deep-fry anything nowadays, and other people will line up to try it. Here's a sampling of what you can get deep-fried: pickles, avocadoes, Oreo cookies, pizza, spaghetti and meatballs (really!) and even Coca-Cola.

Some people think the deep-fried craze erupted as a spiteful counter to the current healthy/organic food movement. Go ahead and sample that deep-fried Twinkie if you must, but don't even think about making it part of your regular diet your heart and waistline will suffer.

Hugely popular in the 1970s, fondue was a staple at dinner parties. Picture it: people gathered around a pot of bubbling cheese, dipping bread and fruits with long forks into the pot, chatting and drinking wine. So cozy! No wonder every newlywed in the '70s seemed to acquire a fondue pot as a gift.

A typical fondue contains cheese, wine, flour and seasonings. A flame keeps it hot while everyone eats. Dipping items might include bread or fruit.

Oil fondues enable you to cook up your own meat. And dessert fondues mean you can dip everything from marshmallows to apricots into warm chocolate.

Just like the frozen yogurt and Cinnabon crazes before it, the cupcake craze is the latest trend in sweet snacks. Most people credit the television show "Sex and the City" with jump-starting the cupcake's massive popularity. After Carrie Bradshaw ate a cupcake from New York's Magnolia Bakery, people were suddenly lining up around the block.

How popular are cupcakes? The Wall Street Journal recently noted that cupcake bakeries are an important part of the improving job market in New York City.

These aren't your mother's cupcakes, either. Today you'll find cupcakes in flavors like dulce de leche, pina colada, peanut butter and jelly, red wine or tiramisu. Yum!

Some people call them "slow cookers," but they're more commonly known by the brand-name Crock Pot. The Crock Pot came out in 1971, and women everywhere immediately embraced it. After all, they could start a meal in the morning, and the Crock Pot would have it ready by dinnertime. Keep in mind, this was during a time when women were entering or re-entering the workforce in record numbers and trying to find a balance between work and home life.

Crock Pot cooking is simple -- just put a bunch of ingredients in the pot, turn on the low heat, and the dish will cook slowly all day. Modern slow cookers come with timers to offer more flexibility with cooking times.

In 1975, Mable Hoffman's "Crockery Cookery" unseated "The Joy of Sex" as the No. 1 selling paperback. Guess we know where priorities were that year!

In the late 1980s, Americans went crazy for oats. Suddenly oatmeal, the scourge of breakfast choices, found itself the most popular girl at the dance. Why all the attention? A study came out stating that eating oats could lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

Faster than you could say "oatmeal cookie," oatmeal products were flying off the shelves. Unfortunately, even though these products contained oatmeal, many them weren't as healthy as advertised. For example, oat bran muffins exploded in popularity, but dieters didn't realize that the egg yolks in the muffins negated any positive effects from the oats. Fear not, though -- it's not all bad news. We simply recommend you make wise and informed choices. The oat bran craze continues today under the guise of the whole-grain trend.

Do you love food? We do, too. Check out the links on the next page to satisfy your appetite!


Top 10 Food Fads of All Time

Merriam-Webster defines "fad" as a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal. We latch onto fads in fashion, pop culture, technology, and, yes, fads in food. Every year it seems there's a new "it" food. Suddenly, every restaurant is serving up the latest craze -- foams, sundried tomatoes, kiwi cocktails. But soon the fad fades, and the "flavor of the week" settles into obscurity, or at the very least, the below-eye-level grocery shelves.

Let's take a look at some of the most popular food fads of all time. You might find some of them tasty. And you might find some of them absolutely gross.

It was created in 1972, but the Atkins diet didn't captivate America until the late '90s and early 2000s. Devotees claimed weight loss of 15 pounds in the first two weeks. And suddenly everything on grocery store shelves was "low-carb," "no-carb" and "Atkins-approved."

The Atkins diet shuns carbohydrates for proteins and fats. During the first phase of the diet, carbs are cut out almost entirely. This means no bread, grains, baked goods, pastas, fruits, nuts or alcohol. Later, "good" carbs like vegetables are slowly added back in.

The medical community states the Atkins diet is no more effective than any other diet. The consensus is that weight loss occurs not because of carb cutting, but because food intake is restricted. Nevertheless, you'll still find plenty of people eating burgers sans buns.

Ah, the TV dinner. We're not talking about the fancy frozen food stocked in today's freezers -- sirloin tips, grilled salmon or pasta primavera. Think 1950s, aluminum trays, and peeling back the foil to reveal steaming-hot turkey or Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes and corn, and a bit of cherry cobbler. People would settle in with their TV dinners on trays in the family room and watch the tube while they ate.

The earliest "TV dinner" dates back to 1945, but it wasn't really a TV dinner it was consumed on airplanes. Around 1954, though, Swanson took the idea and ran with it, pairing up the frozen meal with the latest technology craze -- the small screen.

Swanson launched its line of TV dinners to solve a problem: too many Thanksgiving turkey leftovers -- 260 tons, to be exact.

Believe it or not, bacon is currently enjoying a boom in popularity. We blame this food fad on the Internet everywhere you click, a food blog is waxing poetic about the salted meat. A simple Google search yields endless bacon-related results, including candied bacon, bacon tattoos, bacon salt, deep-fried bacon and even instructions on how to make a bacon bra.

Bacon's not just popular on the Internet, though. The bacon meme has worked its way into real life. Many restaurants and fast-food chains now highlight bacon-heavy entrees on their menus. It's probably one of the most unhealthy food fads ever!

Today, we mostly think of gelatin (and the No. 1 brand, JELL-O) as a dessert. For a while, however, gelatin was actually featured as the main course.

Yep, not only did we serve gelatin as a main course, but we mixed it with things like meat, olives and mayonnaise. It seems crazy now, but gelatin "salads" were all the rage at dinner parties in the 1950s. To wit -- celery-flavored gelatin, congealed with chopped celery, pimento olives and cheese. Lime-flavored gelatin, with mayonnaise, cucumber and canned tuna. Unflavored gelatin with floating bits of turkey, chicken, carrots and green beans.

Think twice before serving a gelatin product to any of your vegetarian friends. Gelatin contains animal by-products, including hooves and bones.

When American astronaut Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon in July 1969, he launched craze for anything space-themed.

The most popular of these was the powdered orange-flavored drink Tang. Although many people believed Tang was created specifically for the space program, it wasn't. At the time, General Foods sold Tang as a travel drink for consumers, but the space program thought it was a great idea. Add in a beloved advertising campaign showing astronauts drinking Tang, and a food fad was born.

Kids who wanted to emulate astronauts also chowed down on "Space Sticks," a forerunner to today's protein bars, and space-age treats like freeze-dried ice cream.

Remember when the only things deep-fried were french fries, onion rings and chicken? Well, things have changed. People will deep-fry anything nowadays, and other people will line up to try it. Here's a sampling of what you can get deep-fried: pickles, avocadoes, Oreo cookies, pizza, spaghetti and meatballs (really!) and even Coca-Cola.

Some people think the deep-fried craze erupted as a spiteful counter to the current healthy/organic food movement. Go ahead and sample that deep-fried Twinkie if you must, but don't even think about making it part of your regular diet your heart and waistline will suffer.

Hugely popular in the 1970s, fondue was a staple at dinner parties. Picture it: people gathered around a pot of bubbling cheese, dipping bread and fruits with long forks into the pot, chatting and drinking wine. So cozy! No wonder every newlywed in the '70s seemed to acquire a fondue pot as a gift.

A typical fondue contains cheese, wine, flour and seasonings. A flame keeps it hot while everyone eats. Dipping items might include bread or fruit.

Oil fondues enable you to cook up your own meat. And dessert fondues mean you can dip everything from marshmallows to apricots into warm chocolate.

Just like the frozen yogurt and Cinnabon crazes before it, the cupcake craze is the latest trend in sweet snacks. Most people credit the television show "Sex and the City" with jump-starting the cupcake's massive popularity. After Carrie Bradshaw ate a cupcake from New York's Magnolia Bakery, people were suddenly lining up around the block.

How popular are cupcakes? The Wall Street Journal recently noted that cupcake bakeries are an important part of the improving job market in New York City.

These aren't your mother's cupcakes, either. Today you'll find cupcakes in flavors like dulce de leche, pina colada, peanut butter and jelly, red wine or tiramisu. Yum!

Some people call them "slow cookers," but they're more commonly known by the brand-name Crock Pot. The Crock Pot came out in 1971, and women everywhere immediately embraced it. After all, they could start a meal in the morning, and the Crock Pot would have it ready by dinnertime. Keep in mind, this was during a time when women were entering or re-entering the workforce in record numbers and trying to find a balance between work and home life.

Crock Pot cooking is simple -- just put a bunch of ingredients in the pot, turn on the low heat, and the dish will cook slowly all day. Modern slow cookers come with timers to offer more flexibility with cooking times.

In 1975, Mable Hoffman's "Crockery Cookery" unseated "The Joy of Sex" as the No. 1 selling paperback. Guess we know where priorities were that year!

In the late 1980s, Americans went crazy for oats. Suddenly oatmeal, the scourge of breakfast choices, found itself the most popular girl at the dance. Why all the attention? A study came out stating that eating oats could lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

Faster than you could say "oatmeal cookie," oatmeal products were flying off the shelves. Unfortunately, even though these products contained oatmeal, many them weren't as healthy as advertised. For example, oat bran muffins exploded in popularity, but dieters didn't realize that the egg yolks in the muffins negated any positive effects from the oats. Fear not, though -- it's not all bad news. We simply recommend you make wise and informed choices. The oat bran craze continues today under the guise of the whole-grain trend.

Do you love food? We do, too. Check out the links on the next page to satisfy your appetite!


Top 10 Food Fads of All Time

Merriam-Webster defines "fad" as a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal. We latch onto fads in fashion, pop culture, technology, and, yes, fads in food. Every year it seems there's a new "it" food. Suddenly, every restaurant is serving up the latest craze -- foams, sundried tomatoes, kiwi cocktails. But soon the fad fades, and the "flavor of the week" settles into obscurity, or at the very least, the below-eye-level grocery shelves.

Let's take a look at some of the most popular food fads of all time. You might find some of them tasty. And you might find some of them absolutely gross.

It was created in 1972, but the Atkins diet didn't captivate America until the late '90s and early 2000s. Devotees claimed weight loss of 15 pounds in the first two weeks. And suddenly everything on grocery store shelves was "low-carb," "no-carb" and "Atkins-approved."

The Atkins diet shuns carbohydrates for proteins and fats. During the first phase of the diet, carbs are cut out almost entirely. This means no bread, grains, baked goods, pastas, fruits, nuts or alcohol. Later, "good" carbs like vegetables are slowly added back in.

The medical community states the Atkins diet is no more effective than any other diet. The consensus is that weight loss occurs not because of carb cutting, but because food intake is restricted. Nevertheless, you'll still find plenty of people eating burgers sans buns.

Ah, the TV dinner. We're not talking about the fancy frozen food stocked in today's freezers -- sirloin tips, grilled salmon or pasta primavera. Think 1950s, aluminum trays, and peeling back the foil to reveal steaming-hot turkey or Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes and corn, and a bit of cherry cobbler. People would settle in with their TV dinners on trays in the family room and watch the tube while they ate.

The earliest "TV dinner" dates back to 1945, but it wasn't really a TV dinner it was consumed on airplanes. Around 1954, though, Swanson took the idea and ran with it, pairing up the frozen meal with the latest technology craze -- the small screen.

Swanson launched its line of TV dinners to solve a problem: too many Thanksgiving turkey leftovers -- 260 tons, to be exact.

Believe it or not, bacon is currently enjoying a boom in popularity. We blame this food fad on the Internet everywhere you click, a food blog is waxing poetic about the salted meat. A simple Google search yields endless bacon-related results, including candied bacon, bacon tattoos, bacon salt, deep-fried bacon and even instructions on how to make a bacon bra.

Bacon's not just popular on the Internet, though. The bacon meme has worked its way into real life. Many restaurants and fast-food chains now highlight bacon-heavy entrees on their menus. It's probably one of the most unhealthy food fads ever!

Today, we mostly think of gelatin (and the No. 1 brand, JELL-O) as a dessert. For a while, however, gelatin was actually featured as the main course.

Yep, not only did we serve gelatin as a main course, but we mixed it with things like meat, olives and mayonnaise. It seems crazy now, but gelatin "salads" were all the rage at dinner parties in the 1950s. To wit -- celery-flavored gelatin, congealed with chopped celery, pimento olives and cheese. Lime-flavored gelatin, with mayonnaise, cucumber and canned tuna. Unflavored gelatin with floating bits of turkey, chicken, carrots and green beans.

Think twice before serving a gelatin product to any of your vegetarian friends. Gelatin contains animal by-products, including hooves and bones.

When American astronaut Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon in July 1969, he launched craze for anything space-themed.

The most popular of these was the powdered orange-flavored drink Tang. Although many people believed Tang was created specifically for the space program, it wasn't. At the time, General Foods sold Tang as a travel drink for consumers, but the space program thought it was a great idea. Add in a beloved advertising campaign showing astronauts drinking Tang, and a food fad was born.

Kids who wanted to emulate astronauts also chowed down on "Space Sticks," a forerunner to today's protein bars, and space-age treats like freeze-dried ice cream.

Remember when the only things deep-fried were french fries, onion rings and chicken? Well, things have changed. People will deep-fry anything nowadays, and other people will line up to try it. Here's a sampling of what you can get deep-fried: pickles, avocadoes, Oreo cookies, pizza, spaghetti and meatballs (really!) and even Coca-Cola.

Some people think the deep-fried craze erupted as a spiteful counter to the current healthy/organic food movement. Go ahead and sample that deep-fried Twinkie if you must, but don't even think about making it part of your regular diet your heart and waistline will suffer.

Hugely popular in the 1970s, fondue was a staple at dinner parties. Picture it: people gathered around a pot of bubbling cheese, dipping bread and fruits with long forks into the pot, chatting and drinking wine. So cozy! No wonder every newlywed in the '70s seemed to acquire a fondue pot as a gift.

A typical fondue contains cheese, wine, flour and seasonings. A flame keeps it hot while everyone eats. Dipping items might include bread or fruit.

Oil fondues enable you to cook up your own meat. And dessert fondues mean you can dip everything from marshmallows to apricots into warm chocolate.

Just like the frozen yogurt and Cinnabon crazes before it, the cupcake craze is the latest trend in sweet snacks. Most people credit the television show "Sex and the City" with jump-starting the cupcake's massive popularity. After Carrie Bradshaw ate a cupcake from New York's Magnolia Bakery, people were suddenly lining up around the block.

How popular are cupcakes? The Wall Street Journal recently noted that cupcake bakeries are an important part of the improving job market in New York City.

These aren't your mother's cupcakes, either. Today you'll find cupcakes in flavors like dulce de leche, pina colada, peanut butter and jelly, red wine or tiramisu. Yum!

Some people call them "slow cookers," but they're more commonly known by the brand-name Crock Pot. The Crock Pot came out in 1971, and women everywhere immediately embraced it. After all, they could start a meal in the morning, and the Crock Pot would have it ready by dinnertime. Keep in mind, this was during a time when women were entering or re-entering the workforce in record numbers and trying to find a balance between work and home life.

Crock Pot cooking is simple -- just put a bunch of ingredients in the pot, turn on the low heat, and the dish will cook slowly all day. Modern slow cookers come with timers to offer more flexibility with cooking times.

In 1975, Mable Hoffman's "Crockery Cookery" unseated "The Joy of Sex" as the No. 1 selling paperback. Guess we know where priorities were that year!

In the late 1980s, Americans went crazy for oats. Suddenly oatmeal, the scourge of breakfast choices, found itself the most popular girl at the dance. Why all the attention? A study came out stating that eating oats could lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

Faster than you could say "oatmeal cookie," oatmeal products were flying off the shelves. Unfortunately, even though these products contained oatmeal, many them weren't as healthy as advertised. For example, oat bran muffins exploded in popularity, but dieters didn't realize that the egg yolks in the muffins negated any positive effects from the oats. Fear not, though -- it's not all bad news. We simply recommend you make wise and informed choices. The oat bran craze continues today under the guise of the whole-grain trend.

Do you love food? We do, too. Check out the links on the next page to satisfy your appetite!


Top 10 Food Fads of All Time

Merriam-Webster defines "fad" as a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal. We latch onto fads in fashion, pop culture, technology, and, yes, fads in food. Every year it seems there's a new "it" food. Suddenly, every restaurant is serving up the latest craze -- foams, sundried tomatoes, kiwi cocktails. But soon the fad fades, and the "flavor of the week" settles into obscurity, or at the very least, the below-eye-level grocery shelves.

Let's take a look at some of the most popular food fads of all time. You might find some of them tasty. And you might find some of them absolutely gross.

It was created in 1972, but the Atkins diet didn't captivate America until the late '90s and early 2000s. Devotees claimed weight loss of 15 pounds in the first two weeks. And suddenly everything on grocery store shelves was "low-carb," "no-carb" and "Atkins-approved."

The Atkins diet shuns carbohydrates for proteins and fats. During the first phase of the diet, carbs are cut out almost entirely. This means no bread, grains, baked goods, pastas, fruits, nuts or alcohol. Later, "good" carbs like vegetables are slowly added back in.

The medical community states the Atkins diet is no more effective than any other diet. The consensus is that weight loss occurs not because of carb cutting, but because food intake is restricted. Nevertheless, you'll still find plenty of people eating burgers sans buns.

Ah, the TV dinner. We're not talking about the fancy frozen food stocked in today's freezers -- sirloin tips, grilled salmon or pasta primavera. Think 1950s, aluminum trays, and peeling back the foil to reveal steaming-hot turkey or Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes and corn, and a bit of cherry cobbler. People would settle in with their TV dinners on trays in the family room and watch the tube while they ate.

The earliest "TV dinner" dates back to 1945, but it wasn't really a TV dinner it was consumed on airplanes. Around 1954, though, Swanson took the idea and ran with it, pairing up the frozen meal with the latest technology craze -- the small screen.

Swanson launched its line of TV dinners to solve a problem: too many Thanksgiving turkey leftovers -- 260 tons, to be exact.

Believe it or not, bacon is currently enjoying a boom in popularity. We blame this food fad on the Internet everywhere you click, a food blog is waxing poetic about the salted meat. A simple Google search yields endless bacon-related results, including candied bacon, bacon tattoos, bacon salt, deep-fried bacon and even instructions on how to make a bacon bra.

Bacon's not just popular on the Internet, though. The bacon meme has worked its way into real life. Many restaurants and fast-food chains now highlight bacon-heavy entrees on their menus. It's probably one of the most unhealthy food fads ever!

Today, we mostly think of gelatin (and the No. 1 brand, JELL-O) as a dessert. For a while, however, gelatin was actually featured as the main course.

Yep, not only did we serve gelatin as a main course, but we mixed it with things like meat, olives and mayonnaise. It seems crazy now, but gelatin "salads" were all the rage at dinner parties in the 1950s. To wit -- celery-flavored gelatin, congealed with chopped celery, pimento olives and cheese. Lime-flavored gelatin, with mayonnaise, cucumber and canned tuna. Unflavored gelatin with floating bits of turkey, chicken, carrots and green beans.

Think twice before serving a gelatin product to any of your vegetarian friends. Gelatin contains animal by-products, including hooves and bones.

When American astronaut Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon in July 1969, he launched craze for anything space-themed.

The most popular of these was the powdered orange-flavored drink Tang. Although many people believed Tang was created specifically for the space program, it wasn't. At the time, General Foods sold Tang as a travel drink for consumers, but the space program thought it was a great idea. Add in a beloved advertising campaign showing astronauts drinking Tang, and a food fad was born.

Kids who wanted to emulate astronauts also chowed down on "Space Sticks," a forerunner to today's protein bars, and space-age treats like freeze-dried ice cream.

Remember when the only things deep-fried were french fries, onion rings and chicken? Well, things have changed. People will deep-fry anything nowadays, and other people will line up to try it. Here's a sampling of what you can get deep-fried: pickles, avocadoes, Oreo cookies, pizza, spaghetti and meatballs (really!) and even Coca-Cola.

Some people think the deep-fried craze erupted as a spiteful counter to the current healthy/organic food movement. Go ahead and sample that deep-fried Twinkie if you must, but don't even think about making it part of your regular diet your heart and waistline will suffer.

Hugely popular in the 1970s, fondue was a staple at dinner parties. Picture it: people gathered around a pot of bubbling cheese, dipping bread and fruits with long forks into the pot, chatting and drinking wine. So cozy! No wonder every newlywed in the '70s seemed to acquire a fondue pot as a gift.

A typical fondue contains cheese, wine, flour and seasonings. A flame keeps it hot while everyone eats. Dipping items might include bread or fruit.

Oil fondues enable you to cook up your own meat. And dessert fondues mean you can dip everything from marshmallows to apricots into warm chocolate.

Just like the frozen yogurt and Cinnabon crazes before it, the cupcake craze is the latest trend in sweet snacks. Most people credit the television show "Sex and the City" with jump-starting the cupcake's massive popularity. After Carrie Bradshaw ate a cupcake from New York's Magnolia Bakery, people were suddenly lining up around the block.

How popular are cupcakes? The Wall Street Journal recently noted that cupcake bakeries are an important part of the improving job market in New York City.

These aren't your mother's cupcakes, either. Today you'll find cupcakes in flavors like dulce de leche, pina colada, peanut butter and jelly, red wine or tiramisu. Yum!

Some people call them "slow cookers," but they're more commonly known by the brand-name Crock Pot. The Crock Pot came out in 1971, and women everywhere immediately embraced it. After all, they could start a meal in the morning, and the Crock Pot would have it ready by dinnertime. Keep in mind, this was during a time when women were entering or re-entering the workforce in record numbers and trying to find a balance between work and home life.

Crock Pot cooking is simple -- just put a bunch of ingredients in the pot, turn on the low heat, and the dish will cook slowly all day. Modern slow cookers come with timers to offer more flexibility with cooking times.

In 1975, Mable Hoffman's "Crockery Cookery" unseated "The Joy of Sex" as the No. 1 selling paperback. Guess we know where priorities were that year!

In the late 1980s, Americans went crazy for oats. Suddenly oatmeal, the scourge of breakfast choices, found itself the most popular girl at the dance. Why all the attention? A study came out stating that eating oats could lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

Faster than you could say "oatmeal cookie," oatmeal products were flying off the shelves. Unfortunately, even though these products contained oatmeal, many them weren't as healthy as advertised. For example, oat bran muffins exploded in popularity, but dieters didn't realize that the egg yolks in the muffins negated any positive effects from the oats. Fear not, though -- it's not all bad news. We simply recommend you make wise and informed choices. The oat bran craze continues today under the guise of the whole-grain trend.

Do you love food? We do, too. Check out the links on the next page to satisfy your appetite!


Top 10 Food Fads of All Time

Merriam-Webster defines "fad" as a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal. We latch onto fads in fashion, pop culture, technology, and, yes, fads in food. Every year it seems there's a new "it" food. Suddenly, every restaurant is serving up the latest craze -- foams, sundried tomatoes, kiwi cocktails. But soon the fad fades, and the "flavor of the week" settles into obscurity, or at the very least, the below-eye-level grocery shelves.

Let's take a look at some of the most popular food fads of all time. You might find some of them tasty. And you might find some of them absolutely gross.

It was created in 1972, but the Atkins diet didn't captivate America until the late '90s and early 2000s. Devotees claimed weight loss of 15 pounds in the first two weeks. And suddenly everything on grocery store shelves was "low-carb," "no-carb" and "Atkins-approved."

The Atkins diet shuns carbohydrates for proteins and fats. During the first phase of the diet, carbs are cut out almost entirely. This means no bread, grains, baked goods, pastas, fruits, nuts or alcohol. Later, "good" carbs like vegetables are slowly added back in.

The medical community states the Atkins diet is no more effective than any other diet. The consensus is that weight loss occurs not because of carb cutting, but because food intake is restricted. Nevertheless, you'll still find plenty of people eating burgers sans buns.

Ah, the TV dinner. We're not talking about the fancy frozen food stocked in today's freezers -- sirloin tips, grilled salmon or pasta primavera. Think 1950s, aluminum trays, and peeling back the foil to reveal steaming-hot turkey or Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes and corn, and a bit of cherry cobbler. People would settle in with their TV dinners on trays in the family room and watch the tube while they ate.

The earliest "TV dinner" dates back to 1945, but it wasn't really a TV dinner it was consumed on airplanes. Around 1954, though, Swanson took the idea and ran with it, pairing up the frozen meal with the latest technology craze -- the small screen.

Swanson launched its line of TV dinners to solve a problem: too many Thanksgiving turkey leftovers -- 260 tons, to be exact.

Believe it or not, bacon is currently enjoying a boom in popularity. We blame this food fad on the Internet everywhere you click, a food blog is waxing poetic about the salted meat. A simple Google search yields endless bacon-related results, including candied bacon, bacon tattoos, bacon salt, deep-fried bacon and even instructions on how to make a bacon bra.

Bacon's not just popular on the Internet, though. The bacon meme has worked its way into real life. Many restaurants and fast-food chains now highlight bacon-heavy entrees on their menus. It's probably one of the most unhealthy food fads ever!

Today, we mostly think of gelatin (and the No. 1 brand, JELL-O) as a dessert. For a while, however, gelatin was actually featured as the main course.

Yep, not only did we serve gelatin as a main course, but we mixed it with things like meat, olives and mayonnaise. It seems crazy now, but gelatin "salads" were all the rage at dinner parties in the 1950s. To wit -- celery-flavored gelatin, congealed with chopped celery, pimento olives and cheese. Lime-flavored gelatin, with mayonnaise, cucumber and canned tuna. Unflavored gelatin with floating bits of turkey, chicken, carrots and green beans.

Think twice before serving a gelatin product to any of your vegetarian friends. Gelatin contains animal by-products, including hooves and bones.

When American astronaut Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon in July 1969, he launched craze for anything space-themed.

The most popular of these was the powdered orange-flavored drink Tang. Although many people believed Tang was created specifically for the space program, it wasn't. At the time, General Foods sold Tang as a travel drink for consumers, but the space program thought it was a great idea. Add in a beloved advertising campaign showing astronauts drinking Tang, and a food fad was born.

Kids who wanted to emulate astronauts also chowed down on "Space Sticks," a forerunner to today's protein bars, and space-age treats like freeze-dried ice cream.

Remember when the only things deep-fried were french fries, onion rings and chicken? Well, things have changed. People will deep-fry anything nowadays, and other people will line up to try it. Here's a sampling of what you can get deep-fried: pickles, avocadoes, Oreo cookies, pizza, spaghetti and meatballs (really!) and even Coca-Cola.

Some people think the deep-fried craze erupted as a spiteful counter to the current healthy/organic food movement. Go ahead and sample that deep-fried Twinkie if you must, but don't even think about making it part of your regular diet your heart and waistline will suffer.

Hugely popular in the 1970s, fondue was a staple at dinner parties. Picture it: people gathered around a pot of bubbling cheese, dipping bread and fruits with long forks into the pot, chatting and drinking wine. So cozy! No wonder every newlywed in the '70s seemed to acquire a fondue pot as a gift.

A typical fondue contains cheese, wine, flour and seasonings. A flame keeps it hot while everyone eats. Dipping items might include bread or fruit.

Oil fondues enable you to cook up your own meat. And dessert fondues mean you can dip everything from marshmallows to apricots into warm chocolate.

Just like the frozen yogurt and Cinnabon crazes before it, the cupcake craze is the latest trend in sweet snacks. Most people credit the television show "Sex and the City" with jump-starting the cupcake's massive popularity. After Carrie Bradshaw ate a cupcake from New York's Magnolia Bakery, people were suddenly lining up around the block.

How popular are cupcakes? The Wall Street Journal recently noted that cupcake bakeries are an important part of the improving job market in New York City.

These aren't your mother's cupcakes, either. Today you'll find cupcakes in flavors like dulce de leche, pina colada, peanut butter and jelly, red wine or tiramisu. Yum!

Some people call them "slow cookers," but they're more commonly known by the brand-name Crock Pot. The Crock Pot came out in 1971, and women everywhere immediately embraced it. After all, they could start a meal in the morning, and the Crock Pot would have it ready by dinnertime. Keep in mind, this was during a time when women were entering or re-entering the workforce in record numbers and trying to find a balance between work and home life.

Crock Pot cooking is simple -- just put a bunch of ingredients in the pot, turn on the low heat, and the dish will cook slowly all day. Modern slow cookers come with timers to offer more flexibility with cooking times.

In 1975, Mable Hoffman's "Crockery Cookery" unseated "The Joy of Sex" as the No. 1 selling paperback. Guess we know where priorities were that year!

In the late 1980s, Americans went crazy for oats. Suddenly oatmeal, the scourge of breakfast choices, found itself the most popular girl at the dance. Why all the attention? A study came out stating that eating oats could lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

Faster than you could say "oatmeal cookie," oatmeal products were flying off the shelves. Unfortunately, even though these products contained oatmeal, many them weren't as healthy as advertised. For example, oat bran muffins exploded in popularity, but dieters didn't realize that the egg yolks in the muffins negated any positive effects from the oats. Fear not, though -- it's not all bad news. We simply recommend you make wise and informed choices. The oat bran craze continues today under the guise of the whole-grain trend.

Do you love food? We do, too. Check out the links on the next page to satisfy your appetite!


Top 10 Food Fads of All Time

Merriam-Webster defines "fad" as a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal. We latch onto fads in fashion, pop culture, technology, and, yes, fads in food. Every year it seems there's a new "it" food. Suddenly, every restaurant is serving up the latest craze -- foams, sundried tomatoes, kiwi cocktails. But soon the fad fades, and the "flavor of the week" settles into obscurity, or at the very least, the below-eye-level grocery shelves.

Let's take a look at some of the most popular food fads of all time. You might find some of them tasty. And you might find some of them absolutely gross.

It was created in 1972, but the Atkins diet didn't captivate America until the late '90s and early 2000s. Devotees claimed weight loss of 15 pounds in the first two weeks. And suddenly everything on grocery store shelves was "low-carb," "no-carb" and "Atkins-approved."

The Atkins diet shuns carbohydrates for proteins and fats. During the first phase of the diet, carbs are cut out almost entirely. This means no bread, grains, baked goods, pastas, fruits, nuts or alcohol. Later, "good" carbs like vegetables are slowly added back in.

The medical community states the Atkins diet is no more effective than any other diet. The consensus is that weight loss occurs not because of carb cutting, but because food intake is restricted. Nevertheless, you'll still find plenty of people eating burgers sans buns.

Ah, the TV dinner. We're not talking about the fancy frozen food stocked in today's freezers -- sirloin tips, grilled salmon or pasta primavera. Think 1950s, aluminum trays, and peeling back the foil to reveal steaming-hot turkey or Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes and corn, and a bit of cherry cobbler. People would settle in with their TV dinners on trays in the family room and watch the tube while they ate.

The earliest "TV dinner" dates back to 1945, but it wasn't really a TV dinner it was consumed on airplanes. Around 1954, though, Swanson took the idea and ran with it, pairing up the frozen meal with the latest technology craze -- the small screen.

Swanson launched its line of TV dinners to solve a problem: too many Thanksgiving turkey leftovers -- 260 tons, to be exact.

Believe it or not, bacon is currently enjoying a boom in popularity. We blame this food fad on the Internet everywhere you click, a food blog is waxing poetic about the salted meat. A simple Google search yields endless bacon-related results, including candied bacon, bacon tattoos, bacon salt, deep-fried bacon and even instructions on how to make a bacon bra.

Bacon's not just popular on the Internet, though. The bacon meme has worked its way into real life. Many restaurants and fast-food chains now highlight bacon-heavy entrees on their menus. It's probably one of the most unhealthy food fads ever!

Today, we mostly think of gelatin (and the No. 1 brand, JELL-O) as a dessert. For a while, however, gelatin was actually featured as the main course.

Yep, not only did we serve gelatin as a main course, but we mixed it with things like meat, olives and mayonnaise. It seems crazy now, but gelatin "salads" were all the rage at dinner parties in the 1950s. To wit -- celery-flavored gelatin, congealed with chopped celery, pimento olives and cheese. Lime-flavored gelatin, with mayonnaise, cucumber and canned tuna. Unflavored gelatin with floating bits of turkey, chicken, carrots and green beans.

Think twice before serving a gelatin product to any of your vegetarian friends. Gelatin contains animal by-products, including hooves and bones.

When American astronaut Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon in July 1969, he launched craze for anything space-themed.

The most popular of these was the powdered orange-flavored drink Tang. Although many people believed Tang was created specifically for the space program, it wasn't. At the time, General Foods sold Tang as a travel drink for consumers, but the space program thought it was a great idea. Add in a beloved advertising campaign showing astronauts drinking Tang, and a food fad was born.

Kids who wanted to emulate astronauts also chowed down on "Space Sticks," a forerunner to today's protein bars, and space-age treats like freeze-dried ice cream.

Remember when the only things deep-fried were french fries, onion rings and chicken? Well, things have changed. People will deep-fry anything nowadays, and other people will line up to try it. Here's a sampling of what you can get deep-fried: pickles, avocadoes, Oreo cookies, pizza, spaghetti and meatballs (really!) and even Coca-Cola.

Some people think the deep-fried craze erupted as a spiteful counter to the current healthy/organic food movement. Go ahead and sample that deep-fried Twinkie if you must, but don't even think about making it part of your regular diet your heart and waistline will suffer.

Hugely popular in the 1970s, fondue was a staple at dinner parties. Picture it: people gathered around a pot of bubbling cheese, dipping bread and fruits with long forks into the pot, chatting and drinking wine. So cozy! No wonder every newlywed in the '70s seemed to acquire a fondue pot as a gift.

A typical fondue contains cheese, wine, flour and seasonings. A flame keeps it hot while everyone eats. Dipping items might include bread or fruit.

Oil fondues enable you to cook up your own meat. And dessert fondues mean you can dip everything from marshmallows to apricots into warm chocolate.

Just like the frozen yogurt and Cinnabon crazes before it, the cupcake craze is the latest trend in sweet snacks. Most people credit the television show "Sex and the City" with jump-starting the cupcake's massive popularity. After Carrie Bradshaw ate a cupcake from New York's Magnolia Bakery, people were suddenly lining up around the block.

How popular are cupcakes? The Wall Street Journal recently noted that cupcake bakeries are an important part of the improving job market in New York City.

These aren't your mother's cupcakes, either. Today you'll find cupcakes in flavors like dulce de leche, pina colada, peanut butter and jelly, red wine or tiramisu. Yum!

Some people call them "slow cookers," but they're more commonly known by the brand-name Crock Pot. The Crock Pot came out in 1971, and women everywhere immediately embraced it. After all, they could start a meal in the morning, and the Crock Pot would have it ready by dinnertime. Keep in mind, this was during a time when women were entering or re-entering the workforce in record numbers and trying to find a balance between work and home life.

Crock Pot cooking is simple -- just put a bunch of ingredients in the pot, turn on the low heat, and the dish will cook slowly all day. Modern slow cookers come with timers to offer more flexibility with cooking times.

In 1975, Mable Hoffman's "Crockery Cookery" unseated "The Joy of Sex" as the No. 1 selling paperback. Guess we know where priorities were that year!

In the late 1980s, Americans went crazy for oats. Suddenly oatmeal, the scourge of breakfast choices, found itself the most popular girl at the dance. Why all the attention? A study came out stating that eating oats could lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

Faster than you could say "oatmeal cookie," oatmeal products were flying off the shelves. Unfortunately, even though these products contained oatmeal, many them weren't as healthy as advertised. For example, oat bran muffins exploded in popularity, but dieters didn't realize that the egg yolks in the muffins negated any positive effects from the oats. Fear not, though -- it's not all bad news. We simply recommend you make wise and informed choices. The oat bran craze continues today under the guise of the whole-grain trend.

Do you love food? We do, too. Check out the links on the next page to satisfy your appetite!


Top 10 Food Fads of All Time

Merriam-Webster defines "fad" as a practice or interest followed for a time with exaggerated zeal. We latch onto fads in fashion, pop culture, technology, and, yes, fads in food. Every year it seems there's a new "it" food. Suddenly, every restaurant is serving up the latest craze -- foams, sundried tomatoes, kiwi cocktails. But soon the fad fades, and the "flavor of the week" settles into obscurity, or at the very least, the below-eye-level grocery shelves.

Let's take a look at some of the most popular food fads of all time. You might find some of them tasty. And you might find some of them absolutely gross.

It was created in 1972, but the Atkins diet didn't captivate America until the late '90s and early 2000s. Devotees claimed weight loss of 15 pounds in the first two weeks. And suddenly everything on grocery store shelves was "low-carb," "no-carb" and "Atkins-approved."

The Atkins diet shuns carbohydrates for proteins and fats. During the first phase of the diet, carbs are cut out almost entirely. This means no bread, grains, baked goods, pastas, fruits, nuts or alcohol. Later, "good" carbs like vegetables are slowly added back in.

The medical community states the Atkins diet is no more effective than any other diet. The consensus is that weight loss occurs not because of carb cutting, but because food intake is restricted. Nevertheless, you'll still find plenty of people eating burgers sans buns.

Ah, the TV dinner. We're not talking about the fancy frozen food stocked in today's freezers -- sirloin tips, grilled salmon or pasta primavera. Think 1950s, aluminum trays, and peeling back the foil to reveal steaming-hot turkey or Salisbury steak, mashed potatoes and corn, and a bit of cherry cobbler. People would settle in with their TV dinners on trays in the family room and watch the tube while they ate.

The earliest "TV dinner" dates back to 1945, but it wasn't really a TV dinner it was consumed on airplanes. Around 1954, though, Swanson took the idea and ran with it, pairing up the frozen meal with the latest technology craze -- the small screen.

Swanson launched its line of TV dinners to solve a problem: too many Thanksgiving turkey leftovers -- 260 tons, to be exact.

Believe it or not, bacon is currently enjoying a boom in popularity. We blame this food fad on the Internet everywhere you click, a food blog is waxing poetic about the salted meat. A simple Google search yields endless bacon-related results, including candied bacon, bacon tattoos, bacon salt, deep-fried bacon and even instructions on how to make a bacon bra.

Bacon's not just popular on the Internet, though. The bacon meme has worked its way into real life. Many restaurants and fast-food chains now highlight bacon-heavy entrees on their menus. It's probably one of the most unhealthy food fads ever!

Today, we mostly think of gelatin (and the No. 1 brand, JELL-O) as a dessert. For a while, however, gelatin was actually featured as the main course.

Yep, not only did we serve gelatin as a main course, but we mixed it with things like meat, olives and mayonnaise. It seems crazy now, but gelatin "salads" were all the rage at dinner parties in the 1950s. To wit -- celery-flavored gelatin, congealed with chopped celery, pimento olives and cheese. Lime-flavored gelatin, with mayonnaise, cucumber and canned tuna. Unflavored gelatin with floating bits of turkey, chicken, carrots and green beans.

Think twice before serving a gelatin product to any of your vegetarian friends. Gelatin contains animal by-products, including hooves and bones.

When American astronaut Neil Armstrong first set foot on the moon in July 1969, he launched craze for anything space-themed.

The most popular of these was the powdered orange-flavored drink Tang. Although many people believed Tang was created specifically for the space program, it wasn't. At the time, General Foods sold Tang as a travel drink for consumers, but the space program thought it was a great idea. Add in a beloved advertising campaign showing astronauts drinking Tang, and a food fad was born.

Kids who wanted to emulate astronauts also chowed down on "Space Sticks," a forerunner to today's protein bars, and space-age treats like freeze-dried ice cream.

Remember when the only things deep-fried were french fries, onion rings and chicken? Well, things have changed. People will deep-fry anything nowadays, and other people will line up to try it. Here's a sampling of what you can get deep-fried: pickles, avocadoes, Oreo cookies, pizza, spaghetti and meatballs (really!) and even Coca-Cola.

Some people think the deep-fried craze erupted as a spiteful counter to the current healthy/organic food movement. Go ahead and sample that deep-fried Twinkie if you must, but don't even think about making it part of your regular diet your heart and waistline will suffer.

Hugely popular in the 1970s, fondue was a staple at dinner parties. Picture it: people gathered around a pot of bubbling cheese, dipping bread and fruits with long forks into the pot, chatting and drinking wine. So cozy! No wonder every newlywed in the '70s seemed to acquire a fondue pot as a gift.

A typical fondue contains cheese, wine, flour and seasonings. A flame keeps it hot while everyone eats. Dipping items might include bread or fruit.

Oil fondues enable you to cook up your own meat. And dessert fondues mean you can dip everything from marshmallows to apricots into warm chocolate.

Just like the frozen yogurt and Cinnabon crazes before it, the cupcake craze is the latest trend in sweet snacks. Most people credit the television show "Sex and the City" with jump-starting the cupcake's massive popularity. After Carrie Bradshaw ate a cupcake from New York's Magnolia Bakery, people were suddenly lining up around the block.

How popular are cupcakes? The Wall Street Journal recently noted that cupcake bakeries are an important part of the improving job market in New York City.

These aren't your mother's cupcakes, either. Today you'll find cupcakes in flavors like dulce de leche, pina colada, peanut butter and jelly, red wine or tiramisu. Yum!

Some people call them "slow cookers," but they're more commonly known by the brand-name Crock Pot. The Crock Pot came out in 1971, and women everywhere immediately embraced it. After all, they could start a meal in the morning, and the Crock Pot would have it ready by dinnertime. Keep in mind, this was during a time when women were entering or re-entering the workforce in record numbers and trying to find a balance between work and home life.

Crock Pot cooking is simple -- just put a bunch of ingredients in the pot, turn on the low heat, and the dish will cook slowly all day. Modern slow cookers come with timers to offer more flexibility with cooking times.

In 1975, Mable Hoffman's "Crockery Cookery" unseated "The Joy of Sex" as the No. 1 selling paperback. Guess we know where priorities were that year!

In the late 1980s, Americans went crazy for oats. Suddenly oatmeal, the scourge of breakfast choices, found itself the most popular girl at the dance. Why all the attention? A study came out stating that eating oats could lower cholesterol levels in the blood.

Faster than you could say "oatmeal cookie," oatmeal products were flying off the shelves. Unfortunately, even though these products contained oatmeal, many them weren't as healthy as advertised. For example, oat bran muffins exploded in popularity, but dieters didn't realize that the egg yolks in the muffins negated any positive effects from the oats. Fear not, though -- it's not all bad news. We simply recommend you make wise and informed choices. The oat bran craze continues today under the guise of the whole-grain trend.

Do you love food? We do, too. Check out the links on the next page to satisfy your appetite!