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Your Annual Reminder That Pumpkin Spice Doesn’t Actually Contain Pumpkin

Your Annual Reminder That Pumpkin Spice Doesn’t Actually Contain Pumpkin


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The key word is “spice,” not “pumpkin”

iStockPhoto

Pumpkin pie spice mix has been around for ages.

It’s that time of your again, when sweaters start to make their way out of their summer hibernation, the sun starts setting earlier, and all we want to do after work is sit under a blanket on the couch and watch Netflix. It’s also pumpkin spice season, when a spice mix that’s traditionally associated with pumpkin pie seems to take over the entire country. But even though the trend has been raging for years, some people still don’t realize that pumpkin spice-flavored foods and drinks don’t usually contain real pumpkin unless otherwise specified, so we’re taking it upon ourselves to at least make sure that you know this.

Even though the spice blend commonly associated with pumpkin spice has been in use for well over a century, it didn’t really catch on as a fad until Starbucks first came out with their Pumpkin Spice Latte in 2003. Over the past 14 years, each fall season has brought about more and more pumpkin spice-flavored foods, and only a small percentage of them contain anything resembling real pumpkin (ironically, Starbucks began adding a small amount of pumpkin purée to its Pumpkin Spice Lattes in 2015).

If you see the words “pumpkin spice,” don’t assume that there’s pumpkin involved. What you can assume is that whatever you’re about to eat or drink contains some combination of cinnamon, clove, nutmeg, and allspice.


Pumpkin: Doing More With This Winter Squash

My three girls on our annual outing to the local pumpkin farm!

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but “pumpkin” has become synonymous with “autumn” in America. There’s no doubt that Starbucks’ pumpkin spice latte has fed the fall pumpkin hype in the past two decades! However, pumpkins have long been an American tradition since Colonial times and continue to be part of America’s dynamic food culture.

Brief History of Pumpkins
Pumpkins are thought to have originated in North America. But the name “pumpkin” seems to have changed and evolved over many years, sort of like an International game of telephone!

  1. The name pumpkin originates from “pepon,” which is the Greek word for “large melon.”
  2. The French pronunciation of “pepon” sounded more like a nasaly “pompon.”
  3. The English then changed “pompon” to “pumpion.”
  4. Finally, American colonists changed “pumpion” into “pumpkin,” as we know it today.

Ways to Eat Pumpkin

The earliest pumpkin pie may have been created by American settlers who filled a hollow pumpkin with a mixture of milk, sugar, spices and honey and cooked it over a fire. Until more recently, Americans often limited pumpkin consumption to pies consumed around Thanksgiving and Christmas. However, pumpkin is very versatile in recipes. In fact, the pulp, seeds and flowers are all edible.

  • Beyond pie, the pulp can be used in soups, pasta dishes, oatmeal, puddings, custards, condiments (pumpkin butter) and of course other baked goods. Pumpkin is even used in beer and dog food.
  • The seeds are delicious toasted with olive oil and salt, or can be flavored with many different spices and seasonings like cinnamon, garlic, parmesan cheese, or curry powder.
  • The flowers are much like zucchini squash flowers, which can be stuffed with ricotta cheese, battered and lightly pan-fried for a delicious Italian-inspired appetizer.

Canned “Pumpkin”

Pumpkin is so versatile in part because canning makes the pureed pulp so convenient and readily available. Illinois farms produce 90% of the canned pumpkin in America. And although people seem to either love pumpkin or hate it, Americans sure do demand a lot of pumpkin. In 2017, Illinois farms produced 644 million pounds of ornamental and processing pumpkins.


Pumpkin: Doing More With This Winter Squash

My three girls on our annual outing to the local pumpkin farm!

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but “pumpkin” has become synonymous with “autumn” in America. There’s no doubt that Starbucks’ pumpkin spice latte has fed the fall pumpkin hype in the past two decades! However, pumpkins have long been an American tradition since Colonial times and continue to be part of America’s dynamic food culture.

Brief History of Pumpkins
Pumpkins are thought to have originated in North America. But the name “pumpkin” seems to have changed and evolved over many years, sort of like an International game of telephone!

  1. The name pumpkin originates from “pepon,” which is the Greek word for “large melon.”
  2. The French pronunciation of “pepon” sounded more like a nasaly “pompon.”
  3. The English then changed “pompon” to “pumpion.”
  4. Finally, American colonists changed “pumpion” into “pumpkin,” as we know it today.

Ways to Eat Pumpkin

The earliest pumpkin pie may have been created by American settlers who filled a hollow pumpkin with a mixture of milk, sugar, spices and honey and cooked it over a fire. Until more recently, Americans often limited pumpkin consumption to pies consumed around Thanksgiving and Christmas. However, pumpkin is very versatile in recipes. In fact, the pulp, seeds and flowers are all edible.

  • Beyond pie, the pulp can be used in soups, pasta dishes, oatmeal, puddings, custards, condiments (pumpkin butter) and of course other baked goods. Pumpkin is even used in beer and dog food.
  • The seeds are delicious toasted with olive oil and salt, or can be flavored with many different spices and seasonings like cinnamon, garlic, parmesan cheese, or curry powder.
  • The flowers are much like zucchini squash flowers, which can be stuffed with ricotta cheese, battered and lightly pan-fried for a delicious Italian-inspired appetizer.

Canned “Pumpkin”

Pumpkin is so versatile in part because canning makes the pureed pulp so convenient and readily available. Illinois farms produce 90% of the canned pumpkin in America. And although people seem to either love pumpkin or hate it, Americans sure do demand a lot of pumpkin. In 2017, Illinois farms produced 644 million pounds of ornamental and processing pumpkins.


Pumpkin: Doing More With This Winter Squash

My three girls on our annual outing to the local pumpkin farm!

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but “pumpkin” has become synonymous with “autumn” in America. There’s no doubt that Starbucks’ pumpkin spice latte has fed the fall pumpkin hype in the past two decades! However, pumpkins have long been an American tradition since Colonial times and continue to be part of America’s dynamic food culture.

Brief History of Pumpkins
Pumpkins are thought to have originated in North America. But the name “pumpkin” seems to have changed and evolved over many years, sort of like an International game of telephone!

  1. The name pumpkin originates from “pepon,” which is the Greek word for “large melon.”
  2. The French pronunciation of “pepon” sounded more like a nasaly “pompon.”
  3. The English then changed “pompon” to “pumpion.”
  4. Finally, American colonists changed “pumpion” into “pumpkin,” as we know it today.

Ways to Eat Pumpkin

The earliest pumpkin pie may have been created by American settlers who filled a hollow pumpkin with a mixture of milk, sugar, spices and honey and cooked it over a fire. Until more recently, Americans often limited pumpkin consumption to pies consumed around Thanksgiving and Christmas. However, pumpkin is very versatile in recipes. In fact, the pulp, seeds and flowers are all edible.

  • Beyond pie, the pulp can be used in soups, pasta dishes, oatmeal, puddings, custards, condiments (pumpkin butter) and of course other baked goods. Pumpkin is even used in beer and dog food.
  • The seeds are delicious toasted with olive oil and salt, or can be flavored with many different spices and seasonings like cinnamon, garlic, parmesan cheese, or curry powder.
  • The flowers are much like zucchini squash flowers, which can be stuffed with ricotta cheese, battered and lightly pan-fried for a delicious Italian-inspired appetizer.

Canned “Pumpkin”

Pumpkin is so versatile in part because canning makes the pureed pulp so convenient and readily available. Illinois farms produce 90% of the canned pumpkin in America. And although people seem to either love pumpkin or hate it, Americans sure do demand a lot of pumpkin. In 2017, Illinois farms produced 644 million pounds of ornamental and processing pumpkins.


Pumpkin: Doing More With This Winter Squash

My three girls on our annual outing to the local pumpkin farm!

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but “pumpkin” has become synonymous with “autumn” in America. There’s no doubt that Starbucks’ pumpkin spice latte has fed the fall pumpkin hype in the past two decades! However, pumpkins have long been an American tradition since Colonial times and continue to be part of America’s dynamic food culture.

Brief History of Pumpkins
Pumpkins are thought to have originated in North America. But the name “pumpkin” seems to have changed and evolved over many years, sort of like an International game of telephone!

  1. The name pumpkin originates from “pepon,” which is the Greek word for “large melon.”
  2. The French pronunciation of “pepon” sounded more like a nasaly “pompon.”
  3. The English then changed “pompon” to “pumpion.”
  4. Finally, American colonists changed “pumpion” into “pumpkin,” as we know it today.

Ways to Eat Pumpkin

The earliest pumpkin pie may have been created by American settlers who filled a hollow pumpkin with a mixture of milk, sugar, spices and honey and cooked it over a fire. Until more recently, Americans often limited pumpkin consumption to pies consumed around Thanksgiving and Christmas. However, pumpkin is very versatile in recipes. In fact, the pulp, seeds and flowers are all edible.

  • Beyond pie, the pulp can be used in soups, pasta dishes, oatmeal, puddings, custards, condiments (pumpkin butter) and of course other baked goods. Pumpkin is even used in beer and dog food.
  • The seeds are delicious toasted with olive oil and salt, or can be flavored with many different spices and seasonings like cinnamon, garlic, parmesan cheese, or curry powder.
  • The flowers are much like zucchini squash flowers, which can be stuffed with ricotta cheese, battered and lightly pan-fried for a delicious Italian-inspired appetizer.

Canned “Pumpkin”

Pumpkin is so versatile in part because canning makes the pureed pulp so convenient and readily available. Illinois farms produce 90% of the canned pumpkin in America. And although people seem to either love pumpkin or hate it, Americans sure do demand a lot of pumpkin. In 2017, Illinois farms produced 644 million pounds of ornamental and processing pumpkins.


Pumpkin: Doing More With This Winter Squash

My three girls on our annual outing to the local pumpkin farm!

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but “pumpkin” has become synonymous with “autumn” in America. There’s no doubt that Starbucks’ pumpkin spice latte has fed the fall pumpkin hype in the past two decades! However, pumpkins have long been an American tradition since Colonial times and continue to be part of America’s dynamic food culture.

Brief History of Pumpkins
Pumpkins are thought to have originated in North America. But the name “pumpkin” seems to have changed and evolved over many years, sort of like an International game of telephone!

  1. The name pumpkin originates from “pepon,” which is the Greek word for “large melon.”
  2. The French pronunciation of “pepon” sounded more like a nasaly “pompon.”
  3. The English then changed “pompon” to “pumpion.”
  4. Finally, American colonists changed “pumpion” into “pumpkin,” as we know it today.

Ways to Eat Pumpkin

The earliest pumpkin pie may have been created by American settlers who filled a hollow pumpkin with a mixture of milk, sugar, spices and honey and cooked it over a fire. Until more recently, Americans often limited pumpkin consumption to pies consumed around Thanksgiving and Christmas. However, pumpkin is very versatile in recipes. In fact, the pulp, seeds and flowers are all edible.

  • Beyond pie, the pulp can be used in soups, pasta dishes, oatmeal, puddings, custards, condiments (pumpkin butter) and of course other baked goods. Pumpkin is even used in beer and dog food.
  • The seeds are delicious toasted with olive oil and salt, or can be flavored with many different spices and seasonings like cinnamon, garlic, parmesan cheese, or curry powder.
  • The flowers are much like zucchini squash flowers, which can be stuffed with ricotta cheese, battered and lightly pan-fried for a delicious Italian-inspired appetizer.

Canned “Pumpkin”

Pumpkin is so versatile in part because canning makes the pureed pulp so convenient and readily available. Illinois farms produce 90% of the canned pumpkin in America. And although people seem to either love pumpkin or hate it, Americans sure do demand a lot of pumpkin. In 2017, Illinois farms produced 644 million pounds of ornamental and processing pumpkins.


Pumpkin: Doing More With This Winter Squash

My three girls on our annual outing to the local pumpkin farm!

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but “pumpkin” has become synonymous with “autumn” in America. There’s no doubt that Starbucks’ pumpkin spice latte has fed the fall pumpkin hype in the past two decades! However, pumpkins have long been an American tradition since Colonial times and continue to be part of America’s dynamic food culture.

Brief History of Pumpkins
Pumpkins are thought to have originated in North America. But the name “pumpkin” seems to have changed and evolved over many years, sort of like an International game of telephone!

  1. The name pumpkin originates from “pepon,” which is the Greek word for “large melon.”
  2. The French pronunciation of “pepon” sounded more like a nasaly “pompon.”
  3. The English then changed “pompon” to “pumpion.”
  4. Finally, American colonists changed “pumpion” into “pumpkin,” as we know it today.

Ways to Eat Pumpkin

The earliest pumpkin pie may have been created by American settlers who filled a hollow pumpkin with a mixture of milk, sugar, spices and honey and cooked it over a fire. Until more recently, Americans often limited pumpkin consumption to pies consumed around Thanksgiving and Christmas. However, pumpkin is very versatile in recipes. In fact, the pulp, seeds and flowers are all edible.

  • Beyond pie, the pulp can be used in soups, pasta dishes, oatmeal, puddings, custards, condiments (pumpkin butter) and of course other baked goods. Pumpkin is even used in beer and dog food.
  • The seeds are delicious toasted with olive oil and salt, or can be flavored with many different spices and seasonings like cinnamon, garlic, parmesan cheese, or curry powder.
  • The flowers are much like zucchini squash flowers, which can be stuffed with ricotta cheese, battered and lightly pan-fried for a delicious Italian-inspired appetizer.

Canned “Pumpkin”

Pumpkin is so versatile in part because canning makes the pureed pulp so convenient and readily available. Illinois farms produce 90% of the canned pumpkin in America. And although people seem to either love pumpkin or hate it, Americans sure do demand a lot of pumpkin. In 2017, Illinois farms produced 644 million pounds of ornamental and processing pumpkins.


Pumpkin: Doing More With This Winter Squash

My three girls on our annual outing to the local pumpkin farm!

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but “pumpkin” has become synonymous with “autumn” in America. There’s no doubt that Starbucks’ pumpkin spice latte has fed the fall pumpkin hype in the past two decades! However, pumpkins have long been an American tradition since Colonial times and continue to be part of America’s dynamic food culture.

Brief History of Pumpkins
Pumpkins are thought to have originated in North America. But the name “pumpkin” seems to have changed and evolved over many years, sort of like an International game of telephone!

  1. The name pumpkin originates from “pepon,” which is the Greek word for “large melon.”
  2. The French pronunciation of “pepon” sounded more like a nasaly “pompon.”
  3. The English then changed “pompon” to “pumpion.”
  4. Finally, American colonists changed “pumpion” into “pumpkin,” as we know it today.

Ways to Eat Pumpkin

The earliest pumpkin pie may have been created by American settlers who filled a hollow pumpkin with a mixture of milk, sugar, spices and honey and cooked it over a fire. Until more recently, Americans often limited pumpkin consumption to pies consumed around Thanksgiving and Christmas. However, pumpkin is very versatile in recipes. In fact, the pulp, seeds and flowers are all edible.

  • Beyond pie, the pulp can be used in soups, pasta dishes, oatmeal, puddings, custards, condiments (pumpkin butter) and of course other baked goods. Pumpkin is even used in beer and dog food.
  • The seeds are delicious toasted with olive oil and salt, or can be flavored with many different spices and seasonings like cinnamon, garlic, parmesan cheese, or curry powder.
  • The flowers are much like zucchini squash flowers, which can be stuffed with ricotta cheese, battered and lightly pan-fried for a delicious Italian-inspired appetizer.

Canned “Pumpkin”

Pumpkin is so versatile in part because canning makes the pureed pulp so convenient and readily available. Illinois farms produce 90% of the canned pumpkin in America. And although people seem to either love pumpkin or hate it, Americans sure do demand a lot of pumpkin. In 2017, Illinois farms produced 644 million pounds of ornamental and processing pumpkins.


Pumpkin: Doing More With This Winter Squash

My three girls on our annual outing to the local pumpkin farm!

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but “pumpkin” has become synonymous with “autumn” in America. There’s no doubt that Starbucks’ pumpkin spice latte has fed the fall pumpkin hype in the past two decades! However, pumpkins have long been an American tradition since Colonial times and continue to be part of America’s dynamic food culture.

Brief History of Pumpkins
Pumpkins are thought to have originated in North America. But the name “pumpkin” seems to have changed and evolved over many years, sort of like an International game of telephone!

  1. The name pumpkin originates from “pepon,” which is the Greek word for “large melon.”
  2. The French pronunciation of “pepon” sounded more like a nasaly “pompon.”
  3. The English then changed “pompon” to “pumpion.”
  4. Finally, American colonists changed “pumpion” into “pumpkin,” as we know it today.

Ways to Eat Pumpkin

The earliest pumpkin pie may have been created by American settlers who filled a hollow pumpkin with a mixture of milk, sugar, spices and honey and cooked it over a fire. Until more recently, Americans often limited pumpkin consumption to pies consumed around Thanksgiving and Christmas. However, pumpkin is very versatile in recipes. In fact, the pulp, seeds and flowers are all edible.

  • Beyond pie, the pulp can be used in soups, pasta dishes, oatmeal, puddings, custards, condiments (pumpkin butter) and of course other baked goods. Pumpkin is even used in beer and dog food.
  • The seeds are delicious toasted with olive oil and salt, or can be flavored with many different spices and seasonings like cinnamon, garlic, parmesan cheese, or curry powder.
  • The flowers are much like zucchini squash flowers, which can be stuffed with ricotta cheese, battered and lightly pan-fried for a delicious Italian-inspired appetizer.

Canned “Pumpkin”

Pumpkin is so versatile in part because canning makes the pureed pulp so convenient and readily available. Illinois farms produce 90% of the canned pumpkin in America. And although people seem to either love pumpkin or hate it, Americans sure do demand a lot of pumpkin. In 2017, Illinois farms produced 644 million pounds of ornamental and processing pumpkins.


Pumpkin: Doing More With This Winter Squash

My three girls on our annual outing to the local pumpkin farm!

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but “pumpkin” has become synonymous with “autumn” in America. There’s no doubt that Starbucks’ pumpkin spice latte has fed the fall pumpkin hype in the past two decades! However, pumpkins have long been an American tradition since Colonial times and continue to be part of America’s dynamic food culture.

Brief History of Pumpkins
Pumpkins are thought to have originated in North America. But the name “pumpkin” seems to have changed and evolved over many years, sort of like an International game of telephone!

  1. The name pumpkin originates from “pepon,” which is the Greek word for “large melon.”
  2. The French pronunciation of “pepon” sounded more like a nasaly “pompon.”
  3. The English then changed “pompon” to “pumpion.”
  4. Finally, American colonists changed “pumpion” into “pumpkin,” as we know it today.

Ways to Eat Pumpkin

The earliest pumpkin pie may have been created by American settlers who filled a hollow pumpkin with a mixture of milk, sugar, spices and honey and cooked it over a fire. Until more recently, Americans often limited pumpkin consumption to pies consumed around Thanksgiving and Christmas. However, pumpkin is very versatile in recipes. In fact, the pulp, seeds and flowers are all edible.

  • Beyond pie, the pulp can be used in soups, pasta dishes, oatmeal, puddings, custards, condiments (pumpkin butter) and of course other baked goods. Pumpkin is even used in beer and dog food.
  • The seeds are delicious toasted with olive oil and salt, or can be flavored with many different spices and seasonings like cinnamon, garlic, parmesan cheese, or curry powder.
  • The flowers are much like zucchini squash flowers, which can be stuffed with ricotta cheese, battered and lightly pan-fried for a delicious Italian-inspired appetizer.

Canned “Pumpkin”

Pumpkin is so versatile in part because canning makes the pureed pulp so convenient and readily available. Illinois farms produce 90% of the canned pumpkin in America. And although people seem to either love pumpkin or hate it, Americans sure do demand a lot of pumpkin. In 2017, Illinois farms produced 644 million pounds of ornamental and processing pumpkins.


Pumpkin: Doing More With This Winter Squash

My three girls on our annual outing to the local pumpkin farm!

I’m not sure exactly when it happened, but “pumpkin” has become synonymous with “autumn” in America. There’s no doubt that Starbucks’ pumpkin spice latte has fed the fall pumpkin hype in the past two decades! However, pumpkins have long been an American tradition since Colonial times and continue to be part of America’s dynamic food culture.

Brief History of Pumpkins
Pumpkins are thought to have originated in North America. But the name “pumpkin” seems to have changed and evolved over many years, sort of like an International game of telephone!

  1. The name pumpkin originates from “pepon,” which is the Greek word for “large melon.”
  2. The French pronunciation of “pepon” sounded more like a nasaly “pompon.”
  3. The English then changed “pompon” to “pumpion.”
  4. Finally, American colonists changed “pumpion” into “pumpkin,” as we know it today.

Ways to Eat Pumpkin

The earliest pumpkin pie may have been created by American settlers who filled a hollow pumpkin with a mixture of milk, sugar, spices and honey and cooked it over a fire. Until more recently, Americans often limited pumpkin consumption to pies consumed around Thanksgiving and Christmas. However, pumpkin is very versatile in recipes. In fact, the pulp, seeds and flowers are all edible.

  • Beyond pie, the pulp can be used in soups, pasta dishes, oatmeal, puddings, custards, condiments (pumpkin butter) and of course other baked goods. Pumpkin is even used in beer and dog food.
  • The seeds are delicious toasted with olive oil and salt, or can be flavored with many different spices and seasonings like cinnamon, garlic, parmesan cheese, or curry powder.
  • The flowers are much like zucchini squash flowers, which can be stuffed with ricotta cheese, battered and lightly pan-fried for a delicious Italian-inspired appetizer.

Canned “Pumpkin”

Pumpkin is so versatile in part because canning makes the pureed pulp so convenient and readily available. Illinois farms produce 90% of the canned pumpkin in America. And although people seem to either love pumpkin or hate it, Americans sure do demand a lot of pumpkin. In 2017, Illinois farms produced 644 million pounds of ornamental and processing pumpkins.



Comments:

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