Other

Root Beer Sazerac Recipe

Root Beer Sazerac Recipe


We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Soda shop meets classic New Orleans cocktail in this clever creation from Adam Schuman, Beverage Director of the Fatty Crew. You can find it on the menu at Fatty 'Cue in Brooklyn, New York.

Ingredients

For the root beer syrup:

  • 2 parts Barq's root beer
  • 1 part water

For the cocktail:

  • ½ ounce root beer syrup
  • 2 ounces Rittenhouse Rye
  • 2 dashes autumn bitters (50/50 Angostura/cranberry bitters)
  • Ice cubes
  • Absinthe rinse
  • Lemon twist, for garnish

Directions

For the root beer syrup:

To make the root beer syrup, reduce root beer over medium heat in a small saucepan and then reconstitute it with water until it's 2 parts root beer to 1 part water.

For the cocktail:

Combine root beer syrup, rye, and bitters in a glass with ice and stir for about 25 seconds. Rinse a rocks glass with absinthe, then strain the rye mixture into the glass.

Flame a twist of lemon over the drink, then discard.


Bourbon & Root Beer

Bourbon and cola is classic. Bourbon and ginger ale: same deal. But bourbon and root beer does not receive the attention it deserves. The fizzy soda’s distinctive bite, imparted by sassafras root, helps dampen bourbon’s sweetness, while the soda’s earthy notes bring out more nuanced aromas. There’s a hint of anise as well, reminiscent of a Sazerac, and a strong vanilla flavor that gives it all a lovely creaminess.

Considering root beer’s history, it is a natural addition to spirits. The method of brewing root beer evolved out of the tradition of small beer—low-ABV brews that offered a less perilous alternative to the contaminated water of Medieval Europe but wouldn’t leave its imbibers sloshed. (Early root beers were at least 2% alcoholic.) A teetotaler produced the first commercial root beer, and then there was Prohibition, and thus root beer became, definitively, a soft drink.

Around the country, bartenders are beginning to tap into root beer’s unrealized potential. “Root beer is an amazing mixer!” says Juyoung Kang, the lead bartender of The Dorsey at The Venetian hotel in Las Vegas. She praises the “great baking spice notes” that echo and enhance the flavors imparted by whiskey barrels. Kristin Lozano, a bartender and consultant in Northern California, says that root beer is the perfect match for whiskey, especially a high-proof bourbon. And Nashville bartender Jonathan Howard also finds root beer superior to more conventional whiskey accompaniments. “Drinks with root beer have far more complexity and richness than just using a common mixer like ginger ale,” he says, citing root beer’s herbaceous quality, vanilla notes and unique viscosity.

These bartenders all use craft root beer for their cocktails and emphasize the importance of choosing one that’s as high-caliber as the whiskey in question.

Still, root beer isn’t as ubiquitous as it should be, so give this recipe a try if you can’t find a root beer cocktail near you. If you love it, join the charge in asking bartenders for bourbon with root beer until it becomes a common option. They’ll only look at you weird until they try it themselves.


So, How Do We Brew Root Beer at Home?

There are a lot of different root beer recipes with a lot of different flavors. The primary ingredient to make root beer is still sassafras root, but since the U.S Food and Drug Administration banned it due to the carcinogenicity, most commercial recipes don’t contain the actual sassafras root most use an artificial sassafras flavoring.

The commercially produced version of root beer is often sweet, carbonated, foamy, non-alcoholic and flavored with artificial sassafras. Methods may include vanilla, cherry tree bark, molasses, anise, cinnamon and honey.

The traditional method for making root beer involves molasses syrup. You should let it cool for three or four hours and then combine it with the root’s ingredients. After that, yeast was added and allow to ferment for 12 or 14 hours, and then it was put through secondary fermentation.

This recipe ended up having 2% alcohol content, and it was often modified to produce more alcohol. The ingredients in the traditional root beer used to include allspice, juniper, wintergreen, hops, spicewood and liquorice. Even some added dandelion root, spikenard, and guaiacum chips.

There is no standard root beer recipe, and a lot of the methods start in the same way. The first step is to boil the sassafras or sarsaparilla root into a strong tea. Once the decoction or extract is done, it’s time to season it with vanilla extract, cherry tree bark or cinnamon.

Some like to add natural honey instead of sugar because it makes it taste a lot better.

The next step in any root beer recipe is carbonation. Carbonation is the word used to talk about carbon dioxide reactions to carbonates, bicarbonates and carbonic acid. Carbonation is what causes the fizziness and bubbles in drinks like soda or beers.

The carbonation in root beer can be done by fermentation, adding yeast to the batch before bottling, or making a syrup—usually with a strong flavor—and slowly mixing it with icy carbonated water. The cold often helps retain the carbonation.

Once you bottle the batch, it comes: the time for fermentation. The fermentation is a metabolic process that occurs in the yeast it basically converts the sugar into acids and gases, highly similar to carbonation.

Remember that, when it comes to making homemade root beer, carbonation is somewhat optional. There is always the option of substituting sassafras root with sarsaparilla root.

What are the ingredients for Root Beer?

To DIY root beer, you use the following main ingredients:

  • Artificial sassafras root bark
  • sweet sarsaparilla.
  • Hoja santa
  • liquorice
  • wild sarsaparilla
  • Black birch or sweet birch
  • Black cherry
  • red, black or Sitka spruce.
  • Burdock root
  • dandelion root.

To create a foamy root beer, you may use cassava, manioc or yucca root, or soapbark.

To spice your root beer, you can season it with:

  • allspice
  • chocolate
  • nutmeg
  • cinnamon
  • cassia
  • clove
  • fennel
  • ginger
  • anise
  • hops
  • mints.

You can make root beer at home using processed extract or roots and herbs not yet processed. You can also create both alcoholic and non-alcoholic root beer. The traditional ones always make a thick and foamy head when poured thanks to the yucca extract and other thickeners.

Is Root Beer Healthy?

Commercial root beer is as harmful for you as any other soda.

Commercial root beer often has high-fructose corn syrup or sugar, and both of these ingredients are directly linked to diabetes and obesity when consumed in large amounts.

Commercial root beer contains a lot more than the healthy amount of sugar a person should be consuming daily. The scariest thing is that high-fructose corn syrup has been put to the test recently, and these studies have found that 50% of the samples contain mercury. This metal can damage your immune system, brain and other vital organs.

The ingredients contained in commercial root beer can cause decay in your tooth enamel, quality of sleep and mood. It can make you irritable, and give you anxiety and depression.

Root beer, if not made at home, it’s loaded with preservatives, chemicals and way too much sugar.

To give root beer its typical brown color, caramel coloring is often used. Caramel coloring has been added to the list of chemicals known to promote cancer, and it can also increase your blood pressure and make your white blood cells count go down.

Also, if you are allergic to gluten, you shouldn’t be drinking root beer it’s mainly because caramel coloring could cause an allergic reaction to people who have a gluten allergy.

All the preservatives include in root beer can mess around with your health as well, mainly because you can find sodium benzoate in root beer. This ingredient prevents the high fructose corn syrup from spoiling. When the manufactured version of this ingredient is used in root beer, it can cause DNA damage, and this can lead to liver problems and Parkison’s disease.

All of this is scary, but it’s also what a lot of commercial sodas can do to your body, so it isn’t a new danger.

Some people will tell you to change this drink for more natural and healthy ones, like kombucha. Kombucha is a fermented tea drink that’s very much like soda, but it has a different taste, and it is actually good for the digestive system. You can even change to drinking sparkling water.

But if you are a root beer fan and you are looking for a better and healthier root beer alternative, you can always make it at home you can take out all the harmful ingredients. Many people in America make their own root beer at home as a tradition.

We have to remember that root beer, as others drinks, started in pharmacies.

Back in the day, there were a lot of pharmacists trying to come up with a cure-it-all drink. That was the case of Charles Hires: he came across his recipe for a good-tasting tea. Back in the day, customers would buy the root beer syrup from the pharmacist and take it home to mix it with seltzer water. Charles Hires refined it into a root beer with more than 25 herbs, and this elixir was brewed by consumers at home.

This traditional root beer was very healthy and good for the body. Sarsaparilla was used as a diuretic and wintergreen leaf was often used to prevent gases and ease digestion. Other herbs used in the making of root beer were widely used in herbal medicine, so this was a potent tea in its time. Even liquorice was used in folkloric medicine to ease digestive distress and treat ulcers.

As such, root beer has excellent qualities when it’s made natural and at home. The commercial root beers actually have to take a very different path. It’s highly recommended to stop consuming these types of drinks if you want to leave a long and healthy life without all the problems that sodas and other similar beverages can promote on your body.

How to Brew Homemade Root Beer?

Now it’s time to explore some methods to make root beer at home. With brewing beer, you can choose between extract and allspice.

Root beer needs sweetener you can use table sugar, corn syrup, beet sugar, brown sugar, or honey. Honey is one of the best options to use.

The rule to use sugar is to use 1 pound of sugar per gallon of homemade root beer. Of course, you dial it down if you want less sweetness than commercial root beer. If you are going to use table sugar, 2 cups per gallon of root beer are excellent. If you are using honey, 1.25 cups per gallon of root beer are perfect.

For the typical non-alcoholic root beer you’ll need:

  • 1.5 cups of sassafras or sarsaparilla root bark.
  • 1.5 teaspoons of wintergreen leaf.
  • 1 pound of sugar or honey.
  • 1 cups molasses.
  • 1 ounce of vanilla extract.
  • Around 2.5 gallons of water.

If you want to do bottle carbonating

  • Neutral ale yeast
  • 3 or 4 cinnamon sticks
  • 1 teaspoon of liquorice roots
  • 0.2 teaspoon of coriander and allspice
  • And 0.2 teaspoons of nutmeg

To prepare, it, add your sassafras root, the wintergreen, vanilla extract and any optional herbs to the water. Bring to boil, and once reached, reduce the heat. Add the molasses and sugar and stir entirely. You need to allow the mix to simmer for 30 or 35 minutes.

Once that is done, cut the heat, and allow it to cool. Add yeast, stir gently and bottle immediately. It’s best if you store the bottle at room temperature.

To pull this recipe, you need to remember to store carbonated bottles in cold temperatures to avoid potential bottle bombs. Plastic soda bottles are the best option for this reason. Do not use baking yeast.

Once your bottles have reached proper carbonation, they are ready to be refrigerated, and your homemade root beer will be drinkable for about five weeks.

If this recipe seems too much for you, you can do this easier one. You’ll need:

  • Root Beer Extract.
  • 2 pounds of sugar or honey.
  • 3 pounds of water.
  • Neutral ale yeast.

You just need to follow the same instructions and replace the spice boiling with the root beer extract.

Does homemade root beer have alcohol? Only if you brew it that way.

So, if you prefer hard root beer or root beer with alcohol, you need to start with a simple dark ale recipe you can find one here.

Keep it simple and make sure it has low bitterness. You can also use a small amount of black or chocolate malt to add color and flavor. Add the spices, and if you are using root beer extract add it during bottling. Adjust the sweetener to desired taste up to 1 pound. Then, all you have to do is condition and drink it.

For making hard root beer, here is another recipe. You’ll need:

  • 5 lbs of light DME.
  • 20 oz of sugar.
  • 1 lb of lactose.
  • Neutral ale yeast.

You just need to brew it as you would brew any other batch of beer.

As explained before, homemade root beer is a very healthy option. You can use unprocessed herbs and roots and add sugar to taste. You can make excellent root beer without complications.

There is a long list of ingredients you can use to make your own unique and fun root beer, from vanilla and chocolate to liquorice and mint. There are endless combinations to try and create, carbonated or not, alcoholic or not.

How is Root Beer made at a big company?

Root beer, when made in big companies, is very industrialized. Machines are doing all the work for long periods until the beer is packaged and delivered to your favourite shop or restaurant.

Some big companies, like A&W, make their root beer fresh every day at their restaurants.

Making beers in big companies is almost always the same. This process is one of the most difficult ones in the food industry. The first step of beer production is preparing the must. The barley malt is crushed and smashed without being made into a homogeneous mass. Then it’s filtered, and clear liquid starts to seep through the layers of grains.

Then it’s time to boil the mix or must. Once the must is boiling, the hops are added depending on the recipe and beer type.

When that is done, it is time for fermentation. The must flows through pipes to fermentation tanks which are usually called cylinder-conic tanks. After the mix is fresh, yeast goes into the mixture. The temperatures are adjusted to reach top fermentation. The must spends a day laying there. A thick head of foam is formed on the surface of the fermentation tank. This means that the yeast is successfully beginning to convert sugar into alcohol and carbon dioxide.

During the fermentation, there is a lot of heat being produced. Because of this, the mix requires constant cooling for a stable temperature.

While the fermentation is happening, brewers monitor the density of carbon dioxide in the tanks, and once this reaches the maximum level, gas is released through pipes.

This process stops once all the sugar contained in the beer has been processed by the yeast.

Some beers go through a process called maturation.

For this process, large stainless steel tanks are necessary, and it last from a few weeks up to four months. While maturation is happening, it’s very important to maintain a stable temperature and pressure in the tank. These parameters cannot be changed without damaging the process, so ensuring the quality of your product during this time is best done by professionals.

One of the last steps is filtration. Right after maturation, the beer passes two filters, different from each other, designed to remove large or small particles. Once that is done, the last step is bottling.

Bottling is the final stage for the production of beers. Beer is poured into different containers, and before filling bottles, everything is washed carefully. Everything should be clean and sterile to preserve the beer correctly.

How is A&W Root Beer made?

In the process of making root beer in big companies, they add a lot of sugar and additives to the mix to create their final product. Yes, it is tasty, but the ingredients often can cause a lot of damage. It’s the same as with any other soda or beer that has been made this way.

One more time, the best option when it comes to root beer is homemade. Yes, it’s quite some work but it is not as hard as it seems, and once you get a hold of it, you can make it every weekend for you and your friends. This way, you get to skip all the dangerous ingredients you will find on commercial root beers.

Both options taste amazing, but only one is really healthy. The best part about making your own root beer is that you can play with all the different flavors you can make.


Recipes

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
3 parts root beer
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Blackberry Whiskey
1 part simple syrup
Dash of bitters
Soda water
Combine ingredients over ice and garnish with cherry.

3 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts 7-up®
1 part lime juice
splash of cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice garnished with a twist of lime.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
3 parts 7-up®
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
2 parts soda water
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
4 parts hot chocolate
Combine ingredients in a glass, stir and serve hot.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Apple Whiskey
3 parts ginger ale
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
3 parts lemon-lime soda
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Irish whiskey
Orange juice chaser
Mix, chill, shoot and chase.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part spiced rum
3 parts hot apple cider
Combine ingredients in a mug, stir and enjoy.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
1 part tequila
3 parts margarita mix
1 part lime juice
Combine ingredients over ice, stir and serve.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts Milk (Chocolate Milk is optional)
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. Blackberry Whiskey
1 part soda
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
3 parts cream soda
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part amaretto
1 part lime juice
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part Platinum Vodka
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Peach Whiskey
3 parts sweet or iced tea
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
1 part Fireball Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. Peach Whiskey
2 parts Ryans® Irish Cream Liqueur

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
3 parts 7-Up®
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part chocolate liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
1 part milk
1 part dark crème de cacao
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part vanilla vodka
3 parts ginger ale
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice with a lemon slice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
2 parts coffee liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. Blackberry Whiskey
1 part lemonade
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Honey Whiskey
3 parts regular or hard cider
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
1 part triple sec
1 part pineapple juice
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Honey Whiskey
1 part Fireball® Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
3 parts Coke®
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Apple Whiskey
2 parts cranberry juice
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Fireball Whisky
1 part Irish cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts Milk (Chocolate Milk is optional)
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part dark rum
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Mcgillicuddy's Mentholmint

Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
3 parts orange juice
Splash of grenadine
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
3 parts Coke®
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
3 parts root beer
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 1/2 part Dr. Honey Whiskey
2 parts ginger ale
Dash Bitters
Combine ingredients over ice and garnish with lemon wedge.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Irish cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part coffee liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part Blackberry Brandy
1 part Triple Sec
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts 7-up®
splash of cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part chocolate liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part Fireball Cinnamon Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part Fireball Cinnamon Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

3 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part Ruby Red Grapefruit Juice
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Irish cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
3 parts Platinum Vodka
Serve chilled ingredients in a martini glass.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. Peach Whiskey
1 part OJ
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
1 part Platinum Vodka
2 parts half and half
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

Must be 21 to follow and engage. Dr. McGillicuddy’s Liqueur 15-30% Alc/Vol Dr. McGillicuddy’s Whiskey with natural flavors 30% alc/vol Sazerac Co., New Orleans, LA.


Recipes

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts Milk (Chocolate Milk is optional)
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Apple Whiskey
2 parts cranberry juice
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Fireball Whisky
1 part Irish cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part coffee liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part Fireball Cinnamon Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
3 parts cream soda
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part amaretto
1 part lime juice
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
2 parts coffee liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

3 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part Ruby Red Grapefruit Juice
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Irish cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
1 part Platinum Vodka
2 parts half and half
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
1 part tequila
3 parts margarita mix
1 part lime juice
Combine ingredients over ice, stir and serve.

1 part Dr. Honey Whiskey
3 parts regular or hard cider
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part vanilla vodka
3 parts ginger ale
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice with a lemon slice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
1 part Fireball Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
3 parts root beer
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
3 parts lemon-lime soda
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
2 parts soda water
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
3 parts Platinum Vodka
Serve chilled ingredients in a martini glass.

2 parts Dr. Peach Whiskey
1 part OJ
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part chocolate liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. Blackberry Whiskey
1 part soda
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part Fireball Cinnamon Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
3 parts Coke®
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part Blackberry Brandy
1 part Triple Sec
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. Peach Whiskey
2 parts Ryans® Irish Cream Liqueur

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part spiced rum
3 parts hot apple cider
Combine ingredients in a mug, stir and enjoy.

1 part Dr. Peach Whiskey
3 parts sweet or iced tea
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Wild Grape
1 part Platinum Vodka
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Honey Whiskey
1 part Fireball® Whisky
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part dark rum
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts Milk (Chocolate Milk is optional)
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

3 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts 7-up®
1 part lime juice
splash of cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice garnished with a twist of lime.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 1/2 part Dr. Honey Whiskey
2 parts ginger ale
Dash Bitters
Combine ingredients over ice and garnish with lemon wedge.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
1 part triple sec
1 part pineapple juice
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
1 part milk
1 part dark crème de cacao
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part chocolate liqueur
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Root Beer
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts Milk (Chocolate Milk is optional)
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
3 parts Coke®
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peach
3 parts orange juice
Splash of grenadine
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Apple Pie
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
4 parts hot chocolate
Combine ingredients in a glass, stir and serve hot.

1 part Dr. Mcgillicuddy's Mentholmint

Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Blackberry Whiskey
1 part simple syrup
Dash of bitters
Soda water
Combine ingredients over ice and garnish with cherry.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Vanilla
2 parts 7-up®
splash of cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Mentholmint
1 part Irish cream
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Coffee
2 parts hot chocolate
Serve hot as a winter warmer

2 parts Dr. Blackberry Whiskey
1 part lemonade
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

2 parts Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Peppermint
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

1 part Dr. Apple Whiskey
3 parts ginger ale
Combine ingredients over ice and serve.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Butterscotch
1 part Irish whiskey
Orange juice chaser
Mix, chill, shoot and chase.

1 part Dr. McGillicuddy’s Cherry
3 parts 7-up®
Serve as a chilled shot or over ice.

Must be 21 to follow and engage. Dr. McGillicuddy’s Liqueur 15-30% Alc/Vol Dr. McGillicuddy’s Whiskey with natural flavors 30% alc/vol Sazerac Co., New Orleans, LA.


The Spruce / Anfisa Strizh

Chill an old-fashioned glass by filling it with ice. Let it sit while you prepare the rest of the drink.

The Spruce / Anfisa Strizh

In a mixing glass, soak the sugar cube with the bitters and muddle to crush the cube.

The Spruce / Anfisa Strizh

Add the rye whiskey and stir.

The Spruce / Anfisa Strizh

Discard the ice in the chilled glass. Rinse it with absinthe: Pour a small amount into the glass, swirl it around, then discard the liquid.

The Spruce / Anfisa Strizh

Pour the whiskey mixture into the absinthe-rinsed glass.

The Spruce / Anfisa Strizh

Gently squeeze the lemon twist over the drink to release its essence. Traditionalists typically discard it and rarely drop it into the glass lay it on the rim as a garnish if you like. Serve and enjoy.

The Spruce / Anfisa Strizh

Where Was the Sazerac Invented?

The story of the Sazerac cocktail began in 1838 when Antoine Amedie Peychaud, a New Orleans apothecary, mixed cognac with his proprietary Peychaud's Bitters. In the 1850s, this "toddy" (not a hot toddy, but an early name for a cocktail) was the signature drink of the Sazerac Coffee House in New Orleans. That's where it received its name and became the first "branded" cocktail. In 1869, bartender Thomas H. Handy purchased the bar from Sewell Taylor. A few years later, he added Peychaud's Bitters to the portfolio of his growing liquor business, which would become the Sazerac Company.

By the 1890s, rye whiskey took over for the brandy, and Handy was selling bottled Sazeracs. In the 1940s, Herbsaint became the anise liqueur of choice, primarily due to the longtime ban of absinthe in the U.S. (it was lifted in 2007). Today, Thomas H. Handy Sazerac Straight Rye Whiskey is a very pricy bottle Sazerac Rye Whiskey is reasonably priced for the average drinker.

Recipe Variations

With nearly two centuries of history, it's understandable that the Sazerac recipe has been mixed in various ways over the years. Even the official cocktail has undergone a number of revisions. Explore these variations to taste the impact that even the slightest change can make.

  • Sazerac recommends a 1 1/2-ounce pour of whiskey, though many drinkers prefer to pour between 2 and 3 ounces. With more whiskey, you may want a second sugar cube.
  • Split the rye whiskey with an equal part of cognac. Typically, each is a 1 1/4-ounce pour.
  • Muddle the sugar cube with a splash of water, then add the bitters to the whiskey.
  • Use a combination of bitters.
  • For a bit of dilution, stir the whiskey mix with a few small ice cubes, then strain into the rinsed glass.
  • Use 1 teaspoon of rich (2:1) simple syrup instead of a sugar cube. Add it to the mix of rye whiskey and bitters with ice, stir, and strain.
  • At one point, the official recipe recommended bourbon as an alternative to rye whiskey. You may want to experiment with bourbons, although this will not be traditional Sazerac, without the spicy profile of rye.
  • If you don't care for the flavor of anise, try another liqueur besides absinthe for the rinse. Of course, it will not be a true Sazerac, but it can be just as interesting. A blood orange Sazerac uses orange liqueur for the rinse, rye for the whiskey, and orange bitters.

How Strong Is the Sazerac?

Sazerac rye whiskey is a 90-proof liquor. Even if you dilute it slightly by stirring it with ice, the Sazerac cocktail is really no different than drinking the whiskey straight—it's merely enhanced. This means the Sazerac is in the 45 percent ABV (90 proof) range and is one of the strongest mixed drinks you can make.

What's the Difference Between an Old-Fashioned and a Sazerac?

There are similar elements to these drinks, as both contain bitters and a citrus twist, but the base spirit is different.


17 thoughts on &ldquo Two Homemade Root Beer Recipes ("Soda" and "Hard") &rdquo

I might be a little late to the party on this one but I’m hoping I could get a few more pointers. How long should you let the hard root beer ferment for? And just to be clear, I don’t need to add any priming sugar to carbonate? Thanks so much for any help you guys can give me.

Mark, how long it may take can vary. What you need to do is keep track with a hydrometer. The ending specific gravity reading will be about 1.023. If you plan to carbonate you will need priming sugar.

I’m wondering if you have any tips on converting the alcoholic version to an all grain recipe. I’m really excited to try it either way, but I prefer to work with grains.

Beth, this may vary from one brewer to the next based on how effective or efficient your mashing techniques are. The conversion is to use 10.5 pounds of Briess 2 Row Brewer’s Malt in place of the extract and the dry malt.
2 Row Malt
http://www.eckraus.com/2-row-brewers-malt-briess-1.html

Thank you so much for the quick reply! I can’t wait to try this!

Will sugar need to be added when bottling since there is already sugar in the recipe? If so how much for a five gallon recipe? I don’t want to have bottle bombs.

Matt, you do not need to add any additional sugar to the recipe. Just like with beer, the yeast and sugar combination will make the carbonation of the Root Beer. You do want to make sure that you bottle the Root Beer in beer bottles with caps or plastic bottles and caps that are made to withstand the pressure. Below is the link to all of the bottles that we have that are acceptable to use for bottling soda pop.
Soda Pop
http://www.eckraus.com/soda-pop-making-recipes-ingredients?limit=all

I’m going to try, a trick made by accident. One batch of beer I forgot to put my hops in my mash. Oups, to much Charlie Papazian relaxing. Next weekend realizing my hops inventory was too much. I boiled 1.5 gallons of water and added some honey with no yeast, and let it cool down to 75 degrees, used a filter funnel with cheese cloth on it and dumped it into my carbod, and shook the sh$% out of it to mix it. Stired all the bottom stuff up, and everything blended.Re-activating the yeast. let it bubble in a cool garage with a p-trap hose into a bottle of liquid because it was rely perking, When everything settled and still some perkulating, I racked it and put the normal air trap on. Perked for three days the I soda kegged it . Co2 does make every glass have a head. Taste on this batch is the best in my life, from a screw up on my part. I don’t see why doing a second augmentation of flavors in adding root beer flavor after primary fermentation, with added sugar like honey then capping it off. Honey can be strong if too much is added, but if it is aged alcohol content goes up and it mellows out.

How long can the root beer be stored? How long does it need to be refrigerated? I would like to store it on the shelf at some point, is this possible or am I only to keep it in the fridge until consumption time?

Tayna, actually, after you have carbonated it you will need to store the root beer in the refrigerator until it is all consumed. The reason for this is to keep the carbonation pressure from building up to more that the bottles can withstand and risking the bottles exploding.

Just wondering what to do if you want it sweeter? Could you add sugar after the fact? Also on the hard root beer could you use equal amount corn sugar?

Lisa, if you prefer the Root Beer sweeter, then yes you can additional sugar to taste after the carbonation process and refrigerate immediately. Regarding the sugar, if you are asking to substitute the lactose sugar for corn sugar, you want to stay with the lactose sugar. The lactose sugar is non-fermentable sugar that’s purpose is to add body and some sweetness to the hard root beer.

I made a 2 1/2 gal batch half was for the kids so other non alcoholic but the half I left in the fermenter and when it’s done I’m going to add Xylitol sweetener to sweeten it up

How did your fully fermented and backsweetened vversion turn out?

For the Zatarain’s root beer extract does anyone have a recipe for a non-alcoholic in a corny with co2 gas? I’m planning a family Oktoberfest party and would like for my grandkids to have enjoy a kegged root beer.

Instead of bottles could you condition the Zatarain’s Root Beer Recipe in a Korny keg?


Root Beer Sazerac Recipe - Recipes

These are homemade root beer recipes that I acquired though emails and downloads from other sites a long time ago (10+ years). I in no way claim that any of these recipes are mine. (unless they bear my name). Any that I try I will rate after the recipe.

Eric's Bubbling Dry Ice Root Beer Recipe

This recipe was developed after much practicing with extracts and carbonation methods and I blogged about it as a Witches Brew Root Beer. It doesn't have the best Head since it can't be pressurized so carbon dioxide absorption is lower than desired. It can make an nice brew for a Halloween party since it bubbles. NEVER TRY TO SEAL THIS ROOT BEER WHILE DRY ICE IS STILL BUBBLING OR ELSE

Ingredients

  • 3 cups sugar
  • 1 1/2 cups honey
  • 2 tsp vanilla extract
  • 6 tsp McCormick Root Beer Concentrate
  • 1/8 tsp powdered ginger
  • 1/8 tsp ground cinnamon
  • 1/8 tsp ground nutmeg
  • 1/8 tsp ground allspice
  • 2 gal cold water
  • 2 lbs dry ice
  • A serving container that can hold a little over 2 gallons of root beer

Add sugar, honey, vanilla, root beer concentrate, spices, and 4 cups of water in a pot and bring to a rolling boil while stirring.
Reduce heat and let the mixture boil on low for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Add to serving container with the rest (28 cups) of the water.
Crush half the dry ice and add to the cauldron, stir the mixture until the dry ice is largely disolved, this adds the primary carbonation
Add second pound of dry ice as a single or several large blocks if desired. This second pound can bubble for several hours depending on the size of the pieces added and if added all at once or not.

Eric's Mission Root Beer Recipe

So while I was on my mission in Madagascar, I found the soda water root beer recipe to be less than pleasing and adapted it to find this. This is a great recipe for missionaries in far away lands. Since all of the ingredients are available just about anywhere, all you need to send your missionary is the root beer extract. I made this for a pizza party at the mission home and everyone was very impressed and said that it tasted like good root beer. It was good enough.

  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 1/4 cup clover honey
  • 3/4 cup water
  • 1 liter cold seltzer water (not with quinine)
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract or imitation vanilla extract
  • 3/4 teaspoon root beer concentrate (McCormick)

Add the vanilla extract into the water and heat until steaming.
If imitation vanilla extract, just heat the water. Once water is
hot dissolve the sugar and honey in the water and then add the root beer
concentrate and imitation vanilla extract if applicable. Let mixture
cool in refrigerator. Slowly pour mixture and seltzer water into a pitcher
and drink. Makes 5 cups.

Root Beer Carbonated with Soda Water

On my mission my parents sent me some root beer extract and I remembered that I had this recipe on my site. I made it the first time with tonic water with quinine and it was absolutely awful because quinine is terribly bitter. When I did it with plain soda water it was ok, but it needed to be creamier with some honey so I adapted it and made my own Mission Recipe.

  • 3/4 cup granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup hot water
  • 1 liter cold seltzer water (not with quinine)
  • 1/2 teaspoon plus 1/8 teaspoon root beer concentrate (McCormick)

Dissolve the sugar in the hot water. Add the root beer concentrate
and let cool. Combine the root beer mixture with the cold seltzer
water, drink immediately, or store in refrigerator in tightly
covered container. Makes 5 cups.

Root Beer Carbonated with Yeast

  • 1 tsp. dry yeast
  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 2 cups granulated sugar
  • 1 quart hot water
  • 4 tsp. root beer extract

Dissolve yeast in 1/2 cup warm water. Dissolve sugar in 1 quart
hot water.

Mix together dissolved yeast, sugar and root beer extract in a
gallon jar. Fill jar with warm water and stir until all ingredients are
well combined. Cover jar. Set in warm sun for four hours. The
root beer will be ready to drink the next day. Chill before serving.

1912 Root Beer Recipe

This was from Excellent Recipes for Baking Raised Bread, from the Fleishman Company,1912.

  • 1 cake, compressed yeast
  • 5 pounds, sugar
  • 2 ounces, sassafras root
  • 1 ounce, hops or ginger root
  • 2 ounces, juniper berries
  • 4 gallons, water <
  • 1 ounce, dandelion root
  • 2 ounces, wintergreen

Procedure:
Wash roots well in cold water. Add juniper berries (crushed) and hops. Pour 8 quarts
boiling water over root mixture and boil slowly 20 minutes. Strain through flannel bag.
Add sugar and remaining 8 quarts water. Allow to stand until lukewarm. Dissolve yeast in
a little cool water. Add to root liquid. Stir will. Let settle then strain again and bottle.
Cork tightly. Keep in a warm room 5 to 6 hours, then store in a cool place. Put on ice as
required for use.


Root Beer BBQ Sauce

This post may contain affiliate links. Read my disclosure policy.

Root Beer BBQ Sauce is an easy recipe for a finger-lickin good barbecue sauce. Sweet and tangy bbq sauce made from scratch, perfect for dunking or grilling!

Call it cola, pop, or Coke, a can of soda and Homemade BBQ Sauce go hand in hand, especially in Southern BBQ recipes. Add this delicious root beer version to your favorite Sauce Recipes!

ROOT BEER BBQ SAUCE

One bite of Root Beer BBQ Chicken and you’ll know why cola bbq sauce is a Southern tradition! This homemade Root Beer Barbecue Sauce still uses a full cup of root beer without any ketchup or bottled BBQ sauce. This kid friendly BBQ sauce is packed with flavor!

A can of your favorite root beer makes this sauce sweet and slightly tangy with hints of the vanilla molasses flavor that makes root beer so delicious! The sweetness of Root Beer BBQ Sauce is balanced out by savory spices, onions, and Worcestershire sauce for a well-rounded mild barbecue sauce.

This Root Beer BBQ Sauce recipe is made on the stove top, simmered with cornstarch until it is thick enough for dipping or glazing. If you like a thinner sauce, leave out the cornstarch and cook for half the time. A thin sauce is great for grilling mops or slow cooking. Speaking of slow cooking, you can make Slow Cooker Root Beer BBQ Sauce with tips in this post.

Making Root Beer BBQ Sauce in a slow cooker is a great summer activity for kids! They will love making their very own barbecue sauce and you don’t have to worry about any burnt hands or ingredients. Plus, kids tend to gobble up anything they make themselves. Watch them dip everything from Chicken Tenders to Roasted Broccoli in their Root Beer BBQ Sauce.

You can use Root Beer BBQ Sauce on all your favorite grilled recipes. This is a sweet bbq sauce recipe that can easily burn or char, so it’s not recommended as a grilling marinade. Instead, glaze the mostly cooked meat during the last 5-10 minutes of grilling for flavor.

Root Beer BBQ Sauce is great for slow cooking or baked chicken, beef, and pork recipes. Substitute this BBQ sauce in recipes like Slow Cooker Ribs or Pulled Pork Sandwiches. If you brush on raw meat, like Baked BBQ Chicken, reserve some sauce for dipping and discard the glazing sauce.


Notes

You can adapt this recipe to fit whatever size bottles you do your second ferments in. The end product will be light in color. It won’t look like Sarsaparilla but it will sure have a wonderful taste!

Nutrition Information:

This nutritional information was auto-generated based on serving size, number of servings, and typical information for the ingredients listed. To obtain the most accurate representation of the nutritional information in a given recipe, please calculate the nutritional information with the actual ingredients and amounts used, using your preferred nutrition calculator. Under no circumstances shall the this website and the author be responsible for any loss or damage resulting for your reliance on the given nutritional information. You are solely responsible for ensuring that any nutritional information provided is accurate, complete, and useful.


Watch the video: How to Make White Russian Cocktail Home. Pro. Expert (July 2022).


Comments:

  1. Hapi

    You are absolutely right. In this something is I seem this the excellent idea. I agree with you.

  2. Shakagrel

    a charming sentence

  3. Xanti

    I apologize for interfering ... I can find my way around this question. One can discuss. Write here or in PM.

  4. Ueman

    It seems to me, you are mistaken



Write a message